Wednesday, December 31, 2008

Device for Adapting a Wrist Watch for Wearing on a Shoe

United States Patent
WWW.USPTO.GOV
7,471,593
Loring
December 30, 2008
Device for adapting a wrist watch for wearing on a shoe
Abstract
A device for adapting a wrist watch for securing onto and wearing upon an upper portion of laced footwear is disclosed. The device, used in pairs, secures a wrist watch to the laces of a shoe, sneaker or other laced footwear. The device permits the time to be checked by simply glancing down at the shoe, and leaves the wrists of the wearer free. The device permits the wearer to check the time even when both hands are occupied on a task.
Inventors:
Loring; Charles (Sun Valley, CA)
Appl. No.:
11/517,934
Filed:
September 8, 2006
Current U.S. Class:
368/10 ; 36/136
Current International Class:
G04B 47/00 (20060101); A43B 23/00 (20060101)
Field of Search:
368/10,278 36/1,132,361 40/636
References Cited [Referenced By]
U.S. Patent Documents
4651446
March 1987
Yukawa et al.
D341924
December 1993
Clement
5311679
May 1994
Birch, Sr.
5623772
April 1997
Sunderland et al.
5775011
July 1998
Reitano, Jr.
5970633
October 1999
Jones et al.
6470601
October 2002
Zane
6525995
February 2003
Diehl et al.
6536139
March 2003
Darley et al.
7200517
April 2007
Darley et al.
Primary Examiner: Miska; Vit W Attorney, Agent or Firm: Galasso; Raymond M. Galasso & Associates LP WWW.GAPATENTS.COM
Claims
What is claimed is:1. A device for mounting a watch to the laces of a laced shoe, the device comprising: a watch pin receiving member having two opposing ends and a bore spanning therebetween, the bore sized to receive a watch spring pin therethrough; a shoe lace receiving member having two opposing ends and bore spanning therebetween, the bore of the shore lace receiving member sized to receive the shoe lace therethrough; and a coupling member secured on a first end to the watch pin receiving member, secured on a second end to the shoe lace receiving member, the coupling member for coupling the receiving members in a connected spaced relationship. 2. The device for mounting a watch to the laces of a laced shoe of claim 1, wherein the coupling member is substantially rigid; and wherein the coupling member holds the receiving members in a fixed spaced parallel relationship. 3. The device for mounting a watch to the laces of a laced shoe of claim 2, wherein the coupling member and receiving members are formed of one piece injection molded plastic; and the receiving members are in a fixed spaced parallel relationship. 4. The device for mounting a watch to the laces of a laced shoe of claim 1, wherein the coupling member comprises an elastic fabric material; and wherein the receiving members comprise plastic. 5. The device for mounting a watch to the laces of a laced shoe of claim 1, wherein the coupling member and receiving members comprise elastic fabric, the receiving members formed as sewn fabric loops on opposing ends of the coupling member. 6. A device for mounting a watch to the laces of a shoe, the device comprising: a first cylindrical member having a bore, the cylindrical member having an axis of symmetry, the bore through the cylindrical member along the axis of symmetry, the bore sized to receive a watch spring pin therethrough; a second cylindrical member having a bore, the second cylindrical member having an axis of symmetry, the bore through the second cylindrical member along its axis of symmetry, the bore of the shoe lace receiving member sized to receive the shoe lace therethrough; and a coupling member secured on a first end to the first cylindrical member, secured on a second end to the second cylindrical member, the coupling member holding the cylindrical members in a fix distally spaced relationship, wherein the cylindrical members and the coupling member comprise one piece molded plastic. 7. The device for mounting a watch of claim 6, wherein the second cylindrical member has an outside diameter of 5/16 inch and a wall thickness of 1/16 inch; the first cylindrical member has an outside diameter of 3/16 inch and a wall thickness of 1/16 inch; and the coupling member has a web thickness of 1/8 inch and a length between outside wall of first and second cylindrical members of 1/8 inch, wherein the device has an overall length of 5/8 inch.
Description
FIELD OF THE DISCLOSURE The disclosures made herein relate generally to a shoe with a watch attached, and more particularly to a device for attaching a conventional wrist watch onto a shoe using the laces of the shoe, permitting the wearer to stay apprised of the time by looking down at the shoe, eliminating the need to wear or carry a watch. BACKGROUND Watches worn on the wrist are known, as well as other portable devices having a time display capability such as personal digital assistants, calculators, cell phones, and the well known pocket watch. All are necessary tools in a world where appointments must be kept, busses run on schedules, and scheduled meetings must be attended. Many individuals wear various fashion or clothing accessories, sometimes in order to express their style or to accentuate an outfit. Items such as jewelry, rings, bracelets and the like are worn to make a fashion statement or a pleasing presentation. The majority of people wear watches on their wrists, although there is a certain population of people that prefer to wear a pocket watch, or other watches on chains worn around the neck, for example. The discussion of inventive disclosures herein are directed to a device to adapt a conventional wrist watch so as to be secured or securable to the laces of a shoe or other laced footwear and to be worn on the shoe, generally a top portion of the shoe. The disclosed device frees the wrist area of the hands of the wearer and permits the wearer to continue to use their hands for other tasks while providing the advantage to just glance down at the shoes to check the time. A watch secured to a shoe is not how a watch is typically worn or seen in public and is bound to spark conversation and make a statement that a certain group of the population such as young people can find attractive. Wearing the watch on the shoe also allows the wearer to leave the wrists bare or to wear bracelets. There are also special situations where such a device is uniquely adapted to solve a problem. For one example, surgeons while operating must keep their hands sterile and are not permitted to touch personal articles which may compromise the sterile operating environment. A watch worn on the shoe provides a convenient way for a surgeon to check the time. Certain factory workers and mail workers, for example, must keep both hands free to manipulate or sort items to perform their work and would benefit from a device securing a watch to the upper portion of the shoe. Therefore, a device which adapts a wrist watch for wearing on a shoe, a device which permits the time to be checked by simply glancing down at the shoe, a device which allows the wearer to leave the wrists bare, a device which permits the wearer to check the time even when both hands are occupied on a task, a device which permits a surgeon whose hands must remain sterile to check the time, such a device for securing a watch to a laced shoe would be useful and novel. SUMMARY OF THE DISCLOSURE Accordingly, embodiments of the inventive disclosures made herein comprise various embodiments of a device for attaching a conventional wrist watch to the laces of a shoe, permitting the wearer to stay appraised of the time by looking down at the shoe. In one embodiment of the inventive disclosures made herein, a device for attaching a wrist watch to the laces of a laced shoe on a top portion of a shoe comprises a watch spring pin receiving member; a shoe lace receiving member and a coupling member securing and coupling the watch pin member and the shoe lace receiving member into a distally spaced and connected relationship. The watch pin receiving member has two opposing ends and a bore spanning through a central portion of the member between the two ends. The bore is sized to receive a watch spring pin therethrough. Watch spring pins are quite commonly used to attach watch bands to the watch band receiving lugs of a wrist watch and are also applied herein for attaching the wrist watch to the device disclosed herein. The shoe lace receiving member has two opposing ends and a bore spanning therebetween. The bore of the shore lace receiving member is sized to receive the shoe lace therethrough. In one embodiment, the watch pin receiving member as well as the shoe lace receiving member are cylindrical in shape, both with a circular cross section. The disclosed device is not limited to the use of cylindrical watch pin and shoe lace receiving members. Receiving members having other shapes such as rectangular or polygonal are suitable for use in embodiments of the inventive disclosures presented herein. In one or more embodiments of the inventive disclosures made herein, the device for attaching a conventional wrist watch to the laces of a shoe comprises one piece molded plastic material. In one or more embodiments of the inventive disclosures made herein, the device for attaching a conventional wrist watch to the laces of a shoe comprises the receiving members of one piece molded plastic material and the coupling member of an elastic fabric material. In one or more embodiments of the inventive disclosures made herein, the device for attaching a conventional wrist watch to the laces of shoe comprises a one piece elastic fabric material, wherein the receiving members have fabric loops sewn into the ends of the coupling member. It is an objective of the inventive disclosure made herein to provide a device which adapts a wrist watch for wearing on a top portion of a shoe by attaching the wrist watch at opposing ends to the laces of the short over the tongue area. It is another objective of the inventive disclosure made herein to provide a device which adapts a wrist watch for wearing on a device which permits the time to be checked by simply glancing down at the shoe. It is another objective of the inventive disclosure made herein to provide a device which allows the wearer to leave the wrists bare by wearing the watch on the shoe. It is another objective of the inventive disclosure made herein to provide a device which permits the wearer to check the time even when both hands are occupied on a task. It is another objective of the inventive disclosure made herein to provide a device which permits a surgeon whose hands must remain sterile to check the time. These and other objects of the invention made herein will become readily apparent upon further review of the following specification and associated drawings. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The drawings show a form of the invention that is presently preferred; however, the invention is not limited to the precise arrangement shown in the drawings. FIG. 1 depicts an assembly view of one embodiment of a device for attaching a wrist watch to the laces of a laced shoe. FIG. 2 depicts a perspective view of one embodiment of a device for attaching a wrist watch to the laces of a laced shoe. FIG. 3 depicts a side view of one embodiment of a device for attaching a wrist watch to the laces of a laced shoe. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In preparation for explaining the details of the present inventive disclosure, it is to be understood by the reader that the invention is not limited to the presented details of the construction, materials and embodiments as illustrated in the accompanying drawings, as the invention concepts are clearly capable of other embodiments and of being practiced and realized in various ways by applying the disclosure presented herein. FIG. 1 depicts an assembly view of one embodiment of a device for attaching a wrist watch to the laces of a laced shoe. The watch pin receiving member 1 has a bore 2 through the cylindrical watch pin receiving member along the axis of symmetry. The bore 2 is sized to receive a watch spring pin 3 therethrough. The watch pin receiving member is securable to the watch band lugs 4 of the watch 8 by positioning the watch pin receiving member between the lugs with the watch spring pin compressed, then releasing the watch spring pin 3 to engage into the lugs 4. The shoe lace receiving member 5 has a bore 6 through the shoe lace receiving member along its axis of symmetry. The bore of the shore lace receiving member is sized to receive the shoe lace therethrough. The receiving members 2, 5 are secured into a fixed spaced relationship by the coupling member 7 which spans between and is secured to the receiving members 2,5. FIG. 2 depicts a perspective view of one embodiment of a device for attaching a wrist watch to the laces of a laced shoe. Wrist watch 8 is attached by spring pins (not shown in FIG. 2, but shown in FIG. 1) to the device for attaching a wrist watch to the laces of a laced shoe 9. As shown, two devices are required positioned at opposing sides of watch 8. The device for attaching a wrist watch to the laces of a laced shoe 9 is secured to wearer selected variety of laced footwear apparel 11 (sneaker illustrated) by threading shoe lace 10 through the bore in the shoe lace receiving member portion of the device 9 for attaching a wrist watch to the laces of a laced shoe. FIG. 3 depicts a side view of one preferred embodiment of a device for attaching a wrist watch to the laces of a laced shoe. In this preferred embodiment, the shoe lace receiving member has an outside diameter 30 of 5/16 inch and a wall thickness 31 of 1/16 inch. The watch pin receiving member has an outside diameter 32 of 3/16 inch and a wall thickness 33 of 1/16 inch. The coupling member has a web thickness 34 of 1/8 inch and a length 35 between outside wall of first and second cylindrical members of 1/8 inch, wherein the device has an overall length 36 of 5/8 inch. The discussed construction, illustrations and sequence of operation is for one embodiment of the invention but is in no way limiting to other embodiments. The operating modes may be changed and enhanced without deviating from the intention of this inventive disclosure. In the preceding detailed description, reference has been made to the accompanying drawings that form a part hereof, and in which are shown by way of illustration specific embodiments in which the invention may be practiced. These embodiments and certain variants thereof have been described in sufficient detail to enable those skilled in the art to practice the invention. It is to be understood that other suitable embodiments may be utilized and that logical, material, and mechanical changes may be made without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention. To avoid unnecessary detail, the description omits certain information known to those skilled in the art. The preceding detailed description is, therefore, not intended to be limited to the specific forms set forth herein, but on the contrary, it is intended to cover such alternatives, modifications, and equivalents, as can be reasonably included within the spirit and scope of the appended claims. For more information go to WWW.GAPATENTS.COM, WWW.GOOGLE.COM, OR WWW.YAHOO.COM.

Anti-Thief Owner Notification Alarm System for a Two-Wheeled Vehicle, and Method of Same

United States Patent
http://www.uspto.gov/
7,468,667
Moffett
December 23, 2008
Anti-thief owner notification alarm system for a two-wheeled vehicle, and method of same
Abstract
A tamper and theft detection alarm system is provided for a motorcycle, bicycle or other two-wheeled vehicle. The alarm system is configured to detect vehicle movement or theft by monitoring the tilt angle of the vehicle, and once a change in the tilt angle is detected, notifying the rider or owner by wireless cellular telephone. In certain embodiments the motorcycle or bicycle alarm system is additionally provided with a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver configured to receive signals from the United States govemment's Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites or other similar global position locating systems and then interpreting the satellite signals to calculate the vehicle location in global coordinates and then providing these coordinates via synthesized speech to the owner via wireless cellular telephony.
Inventors:
Moffett; Robert L. (Monroe, LA)
Appl. No.:
11/437,165
Filed:
May 19, 2006
Current U.S. Class:
340/571 ; 340/432; 340/539.13
Current International Class:
G08B 13/14 (20060101)
Field of Search:
340/571,429,566,426.19,432,539.13 33/355R
References Cited [Referenced By]
U.S. Patent Documents
4284984
August 1981
Scarpino et al.
4638294
January 1987
Sakurai
4665379
May 1987
Howell et al.
5530427
June 1996
Shieh
5539377
July 1996
Dillon
6014555
January 2000
Tendler
6268794
July 2001
Tzanev
6816090
November 2004
Teckchandani et al.
6956467
October 2005
Mercado, Jr.
7158883
January 2007
Fuchs et al.
7194816
March 2007
Tamura
2006/0164217
July 2006
Bourgine De Meder
Primary Examiner: Tweel, Jr.; John A Attorney, Agent or Firm: Galasso; Raymond M. Galasso & Associates, LP http://www.gapatents.com/
Claims
What is claimed is:1. An anti-theft owner notification alarm system for a motorcycle, bicycle or other two-wheeled vehicle, comprising: a weather tight protective housing having mounting tabs for mounting the alarm to a surface of the vehicle; a key operated alarm system power switch secured to a front face of the protective housing; an electronic logic and control means mounted within said housing having one or more alarm activation inputs; a non-volatile memory electrically interfaced to, addressable from, and exchanging data with said logic and control means, the non-volatile memory for storing one or more phone numbers to be dialed by the alarm system in response to detecting an alarm condition; a cellular telephone device secured within said housing, the cellular device electronically interfaced to said logic and control means, the cellular device configured for initiating and receiving calls on a cellular network under the direction of the logic and control means; a means of generating an audible alarm, the alarm generation means electrically interfaced to the logic and control means and to the cellular device, the audible alarm for transmission by the cellular device; a DTMF tone decoder electrically interfaced to the logic and control means and the cellular device, the tone decoder configured to interpret certain telephone keypad frequencies received by the cellular device as commands to enable or disable the alarm; an electronic alpha-numeric display screen secured to a front face of the protective housing, the display electrically interfaced to the logic and control means; a tilt angle detector having an alarm activation contact output electrically interfaced to the logic and control means, wherein the motorcycle sits at an angle while resting on the side stand, and wherein moving the bike to an upright position for riding or moving the bike activates the contact output; and a plurality of touch sensitive input keys mounted to a front face of said protective housing and electrically interfaced to the logic and control means, the keys comprising: one key for each digit in the set of 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0*, #, the touch sensitive input keys for entering the phone number to be dialed in an alarm condition, wherein when the tilt detector alarm activation output triggers the logic and control means to command the cellular device to dial the one or more stored numbers to notify the owner. 2. The anti-theft owner notification alarm system for a motorcycle or bicycle of claim 1, wherein the one or more phone numbers is one phone number. 3. The anti-theft owner notification alarm system for a motorcycle or bicycle of claim 1, wherein means of generating an audible alarm comprises a digital speech synthesizer, the speech synthesizer programmed to create a spoken language alarm message for transmission by the cellular device. 4. The anti-theft owner notification alarm system for a motorcycle or bicycle of claim 3, wherein the tilt angle detector comprises an electrically conductive metal ball rolling within a curved tubular housing having two electrodes, wherein raising the cycle off its side stand rolls the ball within the tube according to the change in the tilt angle and when it reaches within 2 degrees of vertical relative to the artificial horizon, the ball rolling on the electrodes conducts current triggering the alarm. 5. The anti-theft owner notification alarm system for a motorcycle or bicycle of claim 3, wherein the tilt angle detector comprises a mercury type tilt sensor consisting of a sealed transparent tube having two electrodes and a drop of mercury free to roll within, wherein raising the cycle off its side stand rolls the mercury ball within the tube according to the change in the tilt angle and when it reaches within 2 degrees of vertical relative to the artificial horizon the mercury ball rolling on the electrodes conducts current triggering the alarm. 6. The anti-theft owner notification alarm system for a motorcycle or bicycle of claim 4, further comprising a GPS receiver electrically interfaced to said logic and control means, the GPS receiver providing vehicle position in global positioning system world coordinates to said logic and control means. 7. A method of detecting when a motorcycle, bicycle or other two-wheeled vehicle is moved or stolen and then notifying the owner, the method comprising: keying in a phone number to be called in the event of an alarm situation; detecting a change in the tilt angle of the vehicle to within 2 degrees of vertical; retrieving a phone number to be called from non-volatile memory; commanding a cellular telephone device to dial the phone number over a cellular network; waiting for a cellular call connection to be made; generating an audible alarm signal over the cellular call connection; terminating the cellular call connection; delaying a pre-defined wait time period; and continuing at the above step of retrieving the phone number until alarm deactivation command is received. 8. The method of detecting when a motorcycle, bicycle or other two-wheeled vehicle is moved or stolen of claim 7, wherein the generating an audible alarm step comprises generating a spoken language alarm message over the cellular call connection. 9. The method of detecting when a motorcycle, bicycle or other two-wheeled vehicle is moved or stolen of claim 8, the method further comprising: after the retrieving step, reading vehicle location coordinates from a global positioning system receiver; after the generating an audible alarm step, vocally communicating the vehicle location coordinates to the cellular call recipient.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS This application relies upon United States Patent and Trademark Office disclosure document number 571,903 filed on Mar. 1, 2005, as evidence of a conception date earlier than the filing date of the present patent application. FIELD OF THE DISCLOSURE The disclosures made herein relate generally to the field of vehicle security alarm systems and more particularly, to an electronic vehicle security alarm system for motorcycles, bicycles or other two-wheeled vehicles. BACKGROUND Motorcycles are widely used as an enjoyable and fuel efficient means of conveyance, to ride and see the countryside and enjoy a warm day, as well as for just plain fuel efficient transportation. Motorcycles and bicycles are easier for a thief to steal than an automobile, this due to the lighter weight and smaller size of these two-wheeled vehicles. As can be appreciated, a thief can make off with a motorcycle or bicycle by simply standing the bike upright, raising the side stand and just walking the bike down the road. Of course bicycle theft is especially easy as the bicycle's lighter weight means the bike can just be picked up by a thief and carried away. Conventional means of protecting a bicycle or motorcycle from theft include the use of a combination or key locking device inserted through the wheel spokes to the frame, as well as ignition keys on motorcycles. Such means are relatively ineffective in providing theft protection for the reasons discussed earlier. There is a need for a motorcycle or bicycle theft alarm system that is able to detect when the vehicle is moved, tampered with or when a theft is in progress. Many types of alarm systems are known, particularly for larger vehicles such as automobiles. Conventional types of theft alarms that are available for use with larger vehicles often provide an audible or visual alert when triggered. Such alarms, for example, may sound an audible alarm such as a vehicle horn or flash the headlights in a regular pattern or other means of drawing attention to the vehicle so as to call the public's attention to the vehicle and thereby deter a would be thief. These conventional alarms have a drawback, however, in that the thief is then alerted to the presence of the alarm, and can quickly locate and defeat the alarm, particularly on a small open frame vehicle such as a motorcycle or bicycle. Therefore, what is needed is a motorcycle or bicycle theft alarm system that operates silently without alerting a would be thief, an alarm that can notify the owner without alerting the thief that the theft has been detected and reported. Additionally, bicycles and motorcycles, once stolen, are often very difficult for the owner or authorities to locate and recover. There is a need for a motorcycle or bicycle theft alarm system that can transmit the vehicle location to the owner in a silent and wireless way, again without alerting a thief to its presence. Therefore, a motorcycle and bicycle alarm system that overcomes limitations associated with such conventional vehicle security devices and systems would be useful and novel. SUMMARY OF THE DISCLOSURE Accordingly, embodiments of the inventive disclosures made herein comprise a motorcycle or bicycle alarm system configured to detect vehicle movement or theft by monitoring the tilt angle of the vehicle and once movement is detected to alert the owner by wireless cellular telephone. Certain embodiments of the motorcycle or bicycle alarm system disclosed herein are provided with a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver configured to receive signals from the United States govemment's Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites or other similar global position locating systems and then interpreting the satellite signals to calculate the vehicle location in global coordinates and providing these coordinates via synthesized speech to the owner via wireless cellular. In one embodiment, a motorcycle alarm system comprises a protective control box housing containing a circuit board having electronic logic devices as well as other active and passive electronic components. The alarm circuitry is provided with power supply connections to derive its operating power from the motorcycle battery. With the exception of the power supply connection, all components and sensors are internal to the control box. A key operated alarm system power switch is secured to the front face of the protective housing. A key is required to turn the alarm system power on or off, thereby making the alarm system more difficult to disable. A tilt angle detector is provided interior to the alarm control box. In general, tilt sensors and detectors generate an artificial horizon and measure angular tilt with respect to this horizon. In the preferred embodiment, tilt sensor varieties of interest here are of the type utilizing a metal ball free to roll under the force of gravity within a transparent plastic or glass tube, the tube having electrical contacts to detect when the tilt angle reaches or exceeds a certain angular limit with respect to the artificial horizon. Tilt angle detectors preferred for the subject inventive disclosure include a metal ball contained and rolling within a curved transparent plastic or glass tube, wherein raising the cycle of its side stand rolls the ball roll within the tube according to the change in the tilt angle, and when it reaches within 2 degrees of vertical (90 degrees, +/-2 degrees) relative to the artificial horizon, the alarm is triggered. Another variety of tilt angle detector envisioned for use with the subject alarm system is a mercury type tilt sensor consisting of a closed glass tube inside of which are two electrodes and a drop of mercury free to roll within the tube. The act of raising the cycle off its side stand rest rolls the mercury ball within the tube according to the change in the tilt angle of the cycle. When the cycle reaches within 2 degrees of vertical relative to the artificial horizon, the mercury ball reaches and rolls on the electrodes, thereby allowing electrical current to flow between the electrodes through the mercury drop and thereby triggering the alarm. Both types of tilt angle detectors are known in various forms in the art. Other types of tilt angle detectors may be employed as would be known to those skilled in the art without deviating from the intent and scope of the inventive disclosures herein. For a further example, another type of suitable tilt angle detector is a pendulum type sensor wherein a pendulum or weight used in conjunction with a rotary sensor or rotary switch at the pendulum pivot point. The protective alarm housing is provided with a transparent viewing window through which the tilt angle detector and the position of the metal ball within the transparent tilt detector housing can be viewed. This allows the rider to verify the tilt angle position of the parked motorcycle or bicycle before activating the alarm. An electronic logic and control means is provided on the circuit board mounted within the alarm housing. The logic and control means has an alarm activation input connected to the electrodes of the tilt angle detector. A numeric and symbol keypad is provided on the alarm housing to permit the rider or owner to enter the telephone number to be called, normally the owner's phone number, in the event of a detected alarm. The phone number to be called is stored to the non-volatile memory of the logic and control means and displayed on the electronic alphanumeric display screen secured to a front face of the protective housing of the alarm. Additionally, a cellular telephone device is secured within the alarm housing. The cellular device is electronically interfaced to the logic and control means. The cellular device is configured for initiating and receiving calls over a cellular network under the direction of the logic and control means. The alarm system includes a means of generating an audible alarm that is suitable for transmission over a phone connection. The audible alarm may, for example, consist of a tone having a periodically oscillating frequency that would be understood by the call receiver to be an alarm notice from the alarm system. The audible alarm may also utilize a speech synthesizer configured to produce synthesized human spoken language to more pointedly describe to the call receiver that an alarm condition on the bicycle or motorcycle vehicle has been detected. The alarm is activated as follows. The motorcycle or bicycle is parked resting on its side stand so as to be tilted relative to the directional force of gravity. The tilt angle is confirmed by viewing the ball position in the tilt angle detector through the viewing window of the alarm housing. When the cycle is resting on its side stand it may typically be resting at 10 degrees off true vertical, or a 10-degree tilt. Once the tilt angle is confirmed, the alarm is powered on by momentarily placing a key into the alarm key switch and rotating to the `on` position. Once powered on, the phone number to be called in the event of an alarm is entered into the alarm system through the keypad on the face of the protective alarm housing, for example 310 333 3333. The configured number is displayed in the alphanumeric display of the alarm system. At this point the alarm is now configured but not yet activated. The cycle rider can now activate the alarm system by using a telephone or cellular phone to call the cellular device within the alarm system, for example, 310 333 4444. When the call connects, the alarm is activated by depressing an asterisk `*` on the caller's telephone or cell phone keypad, then disconnecting the call. Similarly, the alarm system can be deactivated by using a telephone or cellular phone to call the cellular device within the alarm system, and then depressing the pound `#` key on the telephone or cell phone keypad, then disconnecting. In a second embodiment, the alarm of the first embodiment includes a battery pack internal to the alarm housing. This embodiment is particularly suited for use with bicycles and other two-wheel vehicles which lack an available power supply to power the alarm system. In a third embodiment the anti-theft owner notification alarm system for a motorcycle or bicycle additionally comprises a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver configured to receive signals from the United States government's Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites or other similar global position locating systems, then interpreting the satellite signals to calculate the vehicle location in global coordinates and provide vehicle location coordinates to the logic and control means. The alarm system then utilizes voice synthesis technology to speak the vehicle coordinates in a synthesized human voice during the automatically dialed and executed alarm notification phone call to the owner's or rider's cell phone or other configured phone number. It is an objective of the inventive disclosures presented herein to provide an alarm system for a motorcycle or bicycle that interfaces with the cellular phone network and is adapted to call a configured telephone so as to provide notification of a tampering or theft alarm condition. It is another object of the inventive disclosures presented herein to provide an alarm system for a motorcycle or bicycle that supports remote activation and deactivation of the alarm system by way of receiving an activate or deactivate command over a cellular phone call session, thereby permitting the alarm to be activated or deactivated remotely. It is another object of the inventive disclosures made herein to provide an alarm system for a motorcycle or bicycle that interfaces with the cellular phone network and provides voice synthesis for use over the network to notify the vehicle owner or operator of the GPS coordinates of the vehicle. These and other objects of the invention made herein will become readily apparent upon further review of the following specification and associated drawings. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The drawings show a form of the invention that is presently preferred; however, the invention is not limited to the precise arrangement shown in the drawings. FIG. 1 is an isometric view of one embodiment of the motorcycle and bicycle alarm system in accordance with the inventive disclosures made herein. FIG. 2 is a cut away view of the alarm enclosure, showing the orientation of tilt angle detector in the interior of the enclosure in accordance with one embodiment of the inventive disclosures made herein. FIG. 3 is an end view of one embodiment of the motorcycle and bicycle alarm system in accordance with the inventive disclosures made herein. FIG. 4 is a partial schematic, partial block diagram of one embodiment of the motorcycle and bicycle alarm system in accordance with the inventive disclosures made herein. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In preparation for explaining the details of the present inventive disclosure, it is to be understood by the reader that the invention is not limited to the presented details of the construction, materials and embodiments as illustrated in the accompanying drawings, as the invention concepts are clearly capable of other embodiments and of being practiced and realized in various ways by applying the disclosure presented herein. FIG. 1 depicts the general appearance of one particular example of the motorcycle or bicycle alarm system in accordance with an embodiment of the inventive disclosures made herein. The alarm system protective housing or enclosure 1, as depicted, has a generally rectangular form. The major width and length dimensions are selected to accommodate a circuit board contained within including the cellular phone device, and in certain embodiments, a GPS receiver. The height of the enclosure assembly is selected to accommodate the mounted height of the circuit board and components in the enclosure including circuit board stand-offs and component heights on the circuit board. The enclosure has two mounting ears 2 secured to opposing ends of the enclosure, the ears provided with mounting holes 3 for mounting the alarm system to a motorcycle or bicycle. A key switch 4 is provided on the face of the alarm housing. The key switch is used to selectively interrupt power to or provide power to the alarm system. An electronic alpha-numeric display 5 is secured to a front face of the protective housing, the display is electrically interfaced to the logic and control means to display the configured telephone number to be automatically called in the event of an alarm condition. The tilt angle detector and the position of the metal ball within the transparent tilt detector housing is visible through the level indicator window 6. A touch sensitive keypad 7 is mounted to a front face of the protective housing and electrically interfaced to the logic and control means. The keypad keys comprise one key for each digit in the set of 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0,*,#. The keypad provides a means for the rider to enter the phone number to be dialed over a cellular network in the event of an alarm condition. Power supply wiring 8 enter the bottom surface of the protective housing, receiving electrical power to operate the alarm system from the motorcycle battery. FIG. 2 is a cut away view of the alarm enclosure, showing the orientation of tilt angle detector in the interior of the enclosure in accordance with one embodiment of the inventive disclosures made herein. The tilt angle detector is positioned directly behind the transparent level indicator window 6 of FIG. 1 so as the position of the metal ball in the tilt angle detector is visible through the transparent level indicator window. In FIG. 2 the orientation of the tilt level is shown, wherein the metal ball 10 is shown positioned when the motorcycle is at 90 degrees relative to the artificial horizon. When the motorcycle is resting on its side stand at approximately 10 degrees from vertical the metal ball rests at position 11. FIG. 3 is an end view of one embodiment of the motorcycle and bicycle alarm system in accordance with the inventive disclosures made herein, showing the protective enclosure 1, the mounting tabs 2, the key switch 4 and the keypad 7. FIG. 4 is a block diagram of circuitry of one exemplary embodiment of the motorcycle and bicycle alarm system in accordance with the inventive disclosures made herein, illustrating by functional blocks the active components of one embodiment of the alarm system. The active components of the alarm system include a processor and logic system 20, a keypad 33 for entering the phone number to be called in an alarm, a key decoder 21 for converting key presses into a digital form readable by the processor and logic system 20, a display driver 22 receiving data from the processor and logic system 20 and converting to drive the display segment of the numeric or alpha-numeric display 23. A master key switch 31 energizes or de-energizes the alarm system by permitting or interrupting current from the power supply 32 to the alarm system. A tilt detector 34 is interfaced to the processor and logic system 20, the tilt detector closing a contact output to the processor and logic system when the motorcycle is raised from its side stand and brought within 2 degrees of a vertical position. A non-volatile memory 24 is addressable by and interfaced to the processor and logic system 20 wherein the non-volatile memory 24 stores the configured phone number to be called in the event an alarm condition is detected. In this particular embodiment the alarm system includes a GPS (Global Positioning System) receiver 25 which provides the current motorcycle or bicycle global position coordinates to the processor and logic system 20. A digital speech synthesizer 26 provides its output to an integrated cellular telephone device 27. In the event of an alarm condition the processor and logic system 20 dials the configured phone number stored in the non-volatile memory 24. Once the telephone at the called number answers, the processor and logic system sends an alarm condition voice message as well as the vehicle coordinates from the GPS system 25 to the speech synthesizer 26. The speech synthesizer 26 then feeds its synthesized human voice message to the called party over the cellular network via cellular device 27 and internal cellular antenna 28. The message repeats for a pre-configured limited time, or until the person called hangs up. Once the call terminates or repeat cycle ends, the processor and logic system waits a selected time period and repeats by redialing the phone call then sending the alarm message and GPS coordinates. This process continues until the alarm system receives a remote deactivate command. The deactivate command is detected as the dual-tone multi-frequency (DTMF) tone set for the telephone pound key `#`. This tone may be sent at any time when a cellular phone 30 connection is present between the alarm system and another phone. For example, the owner after receiving an alarm notification call may command the alarm system to deactivate by depressing the asterisk `*` key on the phone during the call. Alternately, the owner, rider or operator may directly call the cellular phone device in the alarm system and command the alarm system to deactivate by depressing the asterisk `*` key after the connection is made. At any time when the alarm system is configured but not deactivated, the alarm system may be reactivated remotely by using a touch tone or cellular phone 30 to call the cellular device in the alarm system and command the alarm system to activate by depressing the asterisk `* ` key after the connection is made. The alarm activate and deactivate key press commands are detected by DTMF tone set decoder 28 which is interfaced to the processor and logic system 20. In the DTMF standard, low frequency and high frequency sinusoidal audio frequency pairs are generated, one pair corresponding to a phone keypad key pressed and are transmitted over the cellular network. The DTMF standard is a global telephony tone dialing standard. Accordingly, it is a principal object of the inventive disclosures made herein to provide a novel and useful motorcycle and bicycle tamper and theft detection alarm system, one which overcomes the limitations of conventional security measures and systems. In the preceding detailed description, reference has been made to the accompanying drawings that form a part hereof, and in which are shown by way of illustration specific embodiments in which the invention may be practiced. These embodiments and certain variants thereof have been described in sufficient detail to enable those skilled in the art to practice the invention. It is to be understood that other suitable embodiments may be utilized and that logical, material, mechanical, software and electrical changes may be made without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention. To avoid unnecessary detail, the description omits certain information known to those skilled in the art. The preceding detailed description is, therefore, not intended to be limited to the specific forms set forth herein, but on the contrary, it is intended to cover such alternatives, modifications, and equivalents, as can be reasonably included within the spirit and scope of the appended claims. For more information go to http://www.gapatents.com/ OR http://www.google.com/.

Monday, December 22, 2008

Training Apparatus for Learning to Play the Guitar

United States Patent
WWW.USPTO.GOV
7,402,746
Saenz
July 22, 2008
Training apparatus for learning to play the guitar
Abstract
A training apparatus for guiding and independently teaching a user to quickly play a guitar by interpreting stored encoded MIDI music data to guide the user's hands by illuminating sequences of desired finger positions on the frets of a guitar to play the music.
Inventors:
Saenz; Adrian (El Paso, TX)
Appl. No.:
11/592,532
Filed:
November 3, 2006
Current U.S. Class:
84/726 ; 84/267; 84/314R; 84/464A; 84/464R; 84/485R; 84/600; 84/602; 84/604; 84/609; 84/644; 84/646; 84/649; 84/670
Current International Class:
G10H 7/00 (20060101); A63J 17/00 (20060101); A63J 5/10 (20060101); G10H 1/32 (20060101)
Field of Search:
84/602,604-607,609-620,634-638,645-656,666-670,692-700,712-717,723-727,735,736,464R,464A,470R,477R,485R
References Cited [Referenced By]
U.S. Patent Documents
3178501
April 1965
Evans
4132143
January 1979
Stone
4286495
September 1981
Roof
4318327
March 1982
Toups
4559861
December 1985
Patty et al.
4791848
December 1988
Blum, Jr.
4807509
February 1989
Graham
D309468
July 1990
Everett
5408914
April 1995
Breitweiser et al.
6191348
February 2001
Johnson
6452081
September 2002
Ravagni et al.
2002/0005111
January 2002
Ludwig
2004/0182219
September 2004
Sasaki
2004/0187673
September 2004
Stevenson
2004/0244566
December 2004
Steiger
2005/0183566
August 2005
Nash
Primary Examiner: Donovan; Lincoln Assistant Examiner: Uhlir; Christopher Attorney, Agent or Firm: Galasso; Raymond M. Galasso & Associates, LP WWW.GAPATENTS.COM
Claims
What is claimed is:1. A self teaching apparatus for training a user to play a guitar by converting encoded MIDI music data into a user guiding sequence of illuminated finger positions on frets of a six string guitar, the apparatus comprising: a guitar comprising: a body; a neck secured to the body; a fret board having 24 frets spaced along and secured onto the fret board, the fret board secured to the neck; a headstock secured to an upper portion of the neck; six adjustable machine heads for receiving, adjusting and tuning guitar strings, the heads secured to the headstock; a bridge secured to the body; at least one electronic pickup secured to the body; and six strings extending and tensioned between the machine heads and the bridge; an electronic computer based logic system secured within the body of the guitar, the logic system comprising: a programmable logic processor; and a memory means comprising at least one memory device; a plurality of light emitting transparent panels secured to the fret board between the frets, wherein the transparent panels illuminate to indicate finger placement positions during a practice session, and are configured to display other indicators including symbols, numbers, characters, and musical symbols to identify musical properties including pitch, interval, and scale degree, the panels interfaced to the electronic computer based logic system; a hard disk secured within the body of the guitar, the hard disk storing encoded MIDI music, instructional exercises and references, the hard disk interfaced to the electronic logic system; a backlit graphic display screen, the screen secured to the body, the display screen viewable by the user playing the guitar, the display electronically interfaced to the electronic logic system, the screen for displaying status, controls, options, musical scores, staff notation, tablature; a control and edit panel secured to the body of the guitar, the panel including controls for tempo, metronome clicks, transposition, repetition, play, stop, pause, rewind, fast forward, cue, paste, cut and record; a plurality of interface connectors secured to the body and interfaced to the electronic logic system, the interface connectors comprising: at least one universal serial bus (USB) port for interfacing to a computer; at least one FireWire serial bus interface port for interfacing to a computer; at least one RCA type analog audio input connector; at least one RCA type analog audio output connector; at least one Sony/Philips digital interface (S/PDIF) digital audio interface connector; an optical data input connector; an optical data output connector; at least one musical instrument digital interface (MIDI) connector for interfacing to a computer; an audio output connector for attaching headphones; and an audio output connector for connection to an external amplifier; an audio speaker secured to the guitar body and interfaced to the electronic logic system; a recessed flash memory card receptacle with electronic interface, the flash memory card receptacle secured to the guitar body, the receptacle for receiving a flash memory card, the flash memory card for storing recorded music, encoded MIDI music, lessons, exercises; and a rechargeable battery pack secured within the guitar body, the battery pack for powering the self instructional apparatus. 2. The self teaching apparatus for training a user to play a guitar of claim 1, further comprising computer executable code having features including: audio format conversion between audio formats including MP3, MIDI and WAV; file transfer between the apparatus and an external computer; recording of guitar practice sessions; and composing and printing sheet music at the computer. 3. The self teaching apparatus for training a user to play a guitar of claim 1, further comprising: electrically driven self adjusting tuning machine heads wherein the electronic computer based logic system calculates the pitch of each guitar string through the electronic pickup and adjusts the tension of the string for the desired pitch to maintain the guitar in tune. 4. The self teaching apparatus for training a user to play a guitar of claim 1, further comprising: a plurality of tuning pegs, one tuning peg for each machine head, wherein turning the peg adjusts the tension on the string secured to the machine head; three LEDs positioned about the head and secured to the headstock, a first LED indicating the string is in tune, a second LED indicating the string is flat, and a third LED indicating the string is sharp, wherein the guitar is tuned by picking the string and adjusting the tuning peg until first LED indicates the string is in tune. 5. The self teaching apparatus for training a user to play a guitar of claim 1, wherein the guitar body, fret board and neck comprise a transparent material selected from the group consisting of fiberglass, plastic, polymer. 6. The self teaching apparatus for training a user to play a guitar of claim 1, wherein the guitar fret board comprises any of transparent plastic, fiberglass or polymer. 7. The self teaching apparatus for training a user to play a guitar of claim 1, wherein each light emitting transparent panel is configured to be are selectively illuminated in a color selected from a plurality of colors, wherein the illuminating color indicates which finger to depress on the fret during guitar play. 8. The self teaching apparatus for training a user to play a guitar of claim 7, wherein the light emitting transparent panels are electronically selectable to illuminate in blue, green, yellow, and red, wherein blue indicates index finger, green indicates middle finger, yellow indicates ring finger and red indicates pinky finger. 9. The self teaching apparatus for training a user to play a guitar of claim 1, further comprising a plurality of backlit LCD displays, wherein each fret has a LCD display associated with it, wherein the LCD display are secured to a side of the fret board proximate to its associated fret, wherein each LCD display and its backlight are electronically interfaced to the electronic logic system. 10. The self teaching apparatus for training a user to play a guitar of claim 1, further comprising a plurality of backlit screens, wherein each fret has a backlit screen associated with it, wherein the backlit screens are secured within the fret board in spaces between the frets, wherein each backlit screen is electronically selectable to illuminate in blue, green, yellow, and red, wherein blue indicates index finger, green indicates middle finger, yellow indicates ring finger and red indicates pinky finger. 11. The self teaching apparatus for training a user to play a guitar of claim 10, wherein the backlit screens are backlit graphic LCD screens. 12. The self teaching apparatus for training a user to play a guitar of claim 1, wherein the backlit graphic screen is tiltably secured to the body, the backlit graphic screen tiltable for viewing by the user playing the guitar. 13. The self teaching apparatus for training a user to play a guitar of claim 5, wherein the backlit graphic screen is secured internally in the body of the guitar and aligned for viewing by the user playing the guitar.
Description
FIELD OF THE DISCLOSURE The disclosures made herein relate generally to apparatus for training a user to play a stringed musical instrument and, more particularly, to a training apparatus for guiding and independently teaching a user to quickly play a guitar by interpreting encoded MIDI music data to guide the user's hands by illuminating sequences of desired finger positions on the frets of a guitar to play the music. BACKGROUND As a substitute for reading musical staff notation, it is known for a beginner student to learn the guitar by following a printed chord diagram, known as tablature, to determine positions to place the fingers on specific strings and frets corresponding to desired chords or melodic lines to be played. A limitation of this method of learning to play the guitar (Tabs) is that the use of a chord diagram is highly visual, awkward and time consuming as the user must repeatedly move the visual attention from sheet music to the chord diagram to the guitar fret board and back to properly position the fingers and play the sequence of chords. Another method of learning to play the guitar is with the guided help of a guitar instructor. The instructor may attempt to teach the student by demonstrating the placement of the fingers on the strings and frets and guiding the students hand for proper placement. A limitation of the use of a hired instructor is that instruction can be expensive, can not be performed independently and is only available at certain scheduled times (when the instructor is available to teach). Method books and instructional videos are available but can be very difficult to comprehend, especially if the person is musically illiterate. Most instructional books and videos require a basic understanding of music notation. For a person that simply wishes to learn to play the guitar and not interested in becoming a professional musician, method books and instructional videos can be difficult to understand, follow and frustrating to learn from independently. Therefore, apparatus for training a user to play a guitar that permits the student to learn and practice according to their own schedule, a guitar training apparatus that is equipped to accept, play and interpret encoded MIDI music files using the MIDI data to visually illustrate sequences of correct finger placement on strings and frets to play the MIDI music, a guitar training apparatus that can teach a user to play music and songs on the guitar without resorting to printed musical scores, a guitar training apparatus that is less awkward and more time efficient than traditional guitar learning methods thereby allowing the student to progress quickly, such a guitar training apparatus would be useful and novel. SUMMARY OF THE DISCLOSURE Accordingly, embodiments of the inventive disclosures made herein comprise various embodiments of a training apparatus for learning to play the guitar which utilizes encoded MIDI data to interpret into a sequence of illuminated finger positions on frets of a six string guitar neck to guide the user to play the chords scales and melodic/harmonic lines on the guitar. The guitar has been a popular instrument for many centuries. There are many reasons why some people never learn to play the guitar. One of the popular reasons is the difficulty involved in trying to place the fingers on the proper strings and frets. Pressing a string on a fret shortens the length of the instrument string, adjusting the frequency at which it vibrates and the sound pitch it produces. Proper finger placement is key to accomplishing the desired sound. Sometimes those seeking to learn to play the guitar do not wish to pay an instructor to teach them how to play the guitar, so they just play it without ever mastering the true techniques. An objective of this disclosure is to provide an apparatus for training a user to play a guitar without the aid of a teacher or instructor. The apparatus disclosed herein has a fret board using fiber optic wave guides positioned to illuminate, in different colors, fret positions on the fret board of the guitar to guide the user to the proper fingerings and finger placement. The disclosed guitar training apparatus actually guides and teaches the user how to play the guitar. In a first embodiment the training apparatus for learning to play the guitar comprises a training musical instrument in the general form of a guitar having a body, an elongated neck secured to the body, a fret board having 24 frets spaced along and secured onto the fret board with the fret board itself secured to the neck. The apparatus further includes a headstock having six adjustable machine heads for receiving, adjusting and tuning guitar strings, a bridge secured to the body, at least one electronic pickup secured to the body, and six instrument strings extending and tensioned between the machine heads and the bridge. To extend the guitar as a training instrument, the training apparatus for learning to play the guitar includes an electronic computer based logic system secured within the body of the guitar. A plurality of light emitting or illuminated panels between the frets are secured to the fret board positioned to illuminate, in different colors, fingerings and finger locations of these spaces, specifically at locations on the fret board where instrument strings cross over frets. The light is conducted to the fret positions by the use of fiber optic light guides so that the entire space or part of the space between the frets light up. The illuminated fiber optics are interfaced to and controlled by the electronic computer based logic system and are sequentially illuminated during playback of encoded MIDI data to indicate the changing finger placement positions required of the student or user to play the chords, melodic/harmonic lines of the music. In a six string guitar there are six fiber optic panels at each fret (one for each string), and a total of 24 frets on the fret board. The fret board is itself secured onto the neck of the guitar. An operating system, application and data storage means consisting of a hard disk is secured within the body of the guitar and interfaced to the computer based logic system. Among other things, the hard disk stores encoded MIDI music files to be played and interpreted by the training apparatus to illuminating fret finger positions during practice. The hard disk also holds instructional exercises. The guitar training apparatus includes a backlit graphic display screen mounted and hinged to the guitar body. The display is attached such that it can be tilted to a position suitable for viewing by the user playing the guitar. In the case of a transparent guitar the display may be secured internally, within the guitar and positioned at an angle that is easily viewed by the player. The screen displays information including status, controls, options, musical scores, staff notation, and tablature to the user. A control and edit panel is secured to the body of the guitar and interfaced to the computer based logic system. The control and edit panel includes controls to adjust tempo, metronome clicks, to affect editing including transposition and repetition, as well as controlling what is displayed on backlit display screens attached to the side of the fret board near each fret or in the spaces between the frets for each string (discussed later). A plurality of external interface connectors are secured to the body of the guitar and interfaced to the electronic logic system. The interface connectors include at least one universal serial bus (USB) port for interfacing the guitar to a computer, as well as at least one FireWire serial bus interface port again for interfacing to a computer. The USB and FireWire interfaces permit encoded MIDI files to be exchanged between an external computer system and the computer based logic system of the guitar training apparatus. Encoded MIDI files are readily available on the Internet from sites such as `mysongbook.com`. MIDI is a music information exchange standard overseen by the International MIDI Association (IMA). Additionally, music scores may be recorded on the guitar training apparatus then transferred to an external computer over either the USB port or FireWire. FireWire (also known as iLink or IEEE 1394) is a personal computer (and digital audio/digital video) serial bus interface standard offering high-speed communications and isochronous real-time data services between connected devices. Additional interface connectors on the guitar training apparatus include at least one RCA type analog audio input connector and at least one RCA type analog audio output connector. The RCA connectors are conventional analog audio in and audio out connectors such as found on stereo equipment. At least one Sony/Philips digital interface (S/PDIF) digital audio interface connector is provided on the guitar body. S/PDIF or S/P-DIF stands for Sony/Philips Digital Interface Format, also IEC 958 type II, part of IEC-60958. It is a collection of hardware and low-level protocol specifications for carrying PCM stereo digital audio signals between devices and stereo components. An optical data input connector and an optical data output connector are also provided for interfacing the guitar instruction apparatus to external music sources and players. A musical instrument digital interface (MIDI) connector is provided on the body of the guitar, providing a standard MIDI interface to external computers and MIDI devices. Additionally, a conventional headphone jack is provided for playing and practicing the guitar without disturbing others. An audio speaker is secured to the guitar body and interfaced to the electronic logic system in the guitar body. The guitar body includes a recessed flash memory card receptacle with an electronic interface adapted for receiving standard flash memory cards. The flash memory card is useful for storing recorded music, encoded MIDI music, lessons, exercises, as well as providing another means of moving files between an external computer and the guitar training apparatus. The guitar training apparatus can by powered from an internal rechargeable battery pack or powered by an AC adapter. In one or more embodiments the training apparatus for learning to play the guitar includes computer executable code to provide audio format conversions between audio formats including MP3, MIDI and WAV. In one or more embodiments the training apparatus for learning to play the guitar includes electrically driven self adjusting, tension monitoring tuning machine heads, such as the self tuning guitar tuning system marketed by Tronical GmbH of Hamburg, Germany. The computer based logic system utilizes inputs from the electronic pickups to measure the tuned frequency of the six open instrument strings and adjust the tension of the strings for the desired pitch to maintain the guitar in tune. In other embodiments the heads are adjusted manually using conventional tuning pegs with each head having three LEDs positioned about the head, one LED indicating the string is in tune, another indicating the string is flat, and a third indicating the string is sharp. In one or more embodiments of training apparatus for learning to play the guitar, the guitar body, fret board and neck are of a light weight material such as fiberglass or plastic, polymer, and other synthetic fibers In one or more embodiments the apparatus for training a user to play the guitar, the guitar fret board is made of transparent fiberglass, plastic, polymer, and other synthetic fibers. In one or more embodiments the apparatus for training a user to play the guitar, the illuminated panels secured to or within the fretboard between the frets, are of the multicolored variety wherein the illuminated spaces and different colors indicates to the user which particular finger is to be used to depress on the illuminated fret/string position. In certain embodiments using this concept, the multi-color spaces are electronically selectable to illuminate in blue, green, yellow, or red, wherein blue indicates index finger, green indicates middle finger, yellow indicates ring finger and red indicates pinky finger. In one or more embodiments of the teaching apparatus for training a user to play the guitar, a side edge of the fret board includes a plurality of backlit LCD displays. Each fret has a LCD display associated with it and each LCD display is secured to the side of the fret board proximate to its associated fret. Each LCD display and its backlight are electronically interfaced to the electronic logic system such that the electronic control logic system can activate symbols, numbers indicating scales degrees, pitch name, and other musical symbols on the LCD displays. In one or more embodiments the apparatus for training a user to play the guitar includes a plurality of backlit screens, wherein each fret has a backlit screen associated with it. The backlit screens are secured with in the spaces between each fret on the fretboard and electronically interfaced to the electronic logic system such that wherein each backlit screen is electronically selectable by the electronic logic control system to illuminate in blue, green, yellow, and red to indicate which finger to place on the fret, wherein blue indicates index finger, green indicates middle finger, yellow indicates ring finger and red indicates pinky finger. Backlighting can also be controlled according to the rhythm or tempo of the music. The disclosed training apparatus for learning to play the guitar teaches the owner how to play it. Through the use of illuminated panels and in some cases fiber optics, the fret positions on the fret board are illuminated to indicate where to place the fingers next and exactly which frets to press down and play. The backlit LCD displays located near each fret on the fret board indicate through colors, symbols, number, initials which fingers to use (right/left hand), pitch names, scale/chord/degrees, etc. The fret LCD displays or backlit LCD screens light up and blink in sync with the rhythms. The tempo of the rhythm, as well as many other musical properties, may be controlled through the control and edit panel on the guitar body for training purposes. The guitar training apparatus also has a hard disk drive. Encoded MIDI files can be downloaded over the Internet to the hard disk drive (though a USB or FireWire connected external computer). Also to be available are downloads of methods, instructions, step by step from beginner to advanced level exercises, all downloadable to the hard drive of the guitar training apparatus. The methods may include all possible chords, scales, jazz chord progressions, techniques, and instructional exercises. Software for a PC or laptop is provided with the guitar training apparatus, the software to perform audio conversions between various common formats (WAV, MP3 and encoded MIDI for example), as well as for recording and transferring data between the computer and the guitar training apparatus, saving data to the computer, composing, printing sheet music at the computer. The edit and control panel on the guitar body permits the user to control musical aspects of playback and recording including tempo, metronome clicks, transposition, repetition as well as what is displayed on the backlit LCD screens near each fret. The LCD displays at each fret are configurable by the user to display several musical properties including pitch name, scale degrees, and fingers to use on both left and right hands. It is an objective of the inventive disclosure made herein to provide a guitar training apparatus for training a user to play the guitar that permits the student to learn and practice according to their own schedule. It is another objective of the inventive disclosure made herein to provide guitar training apparatus for training a user to play the guitar that is equipped to accept, play and visually interpret (by string and fret illumination) encoded MIDI music files such that the user can learn to play these music pieces on the guitar. It is an objective of the inventive disclosure made herein to provide a guitar training apparatus that can teach a user to play music and songs on the guitar without resorting to printed musical scores nor requiring the user to be able to read and comprehend musical printed scores. It is an objective of the inventive disclosure made herein to provide guitar training apparatus that is less awkward and more time efficient than traditional guitar learning methods thereby allowing the student to progress quickly. The guitar training apparatus is a useful tool for knowledgeable, experienced, advanced guitarists as it can store information such as: all possible chords, chord progressions and scales. In can store a library of information (data) that is easily accessible and easily recalled. No need to carry around chord/charts. It is able to record and store songs played on it and transfer such data into computer software for printing sheet music, mixing tracks, transposition, etc. With it's many ways of transferring and sharing such data, it can basically connect to pretty much anything making it perfect for studio and recording applications. These and other objects of the invention made herein will become readily apparent upon further review of the following specification and associated drawings. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The drawings show a form of the invention that is presently preferred; however, the invention is not limited to the precise arrangement shown in the drawings. FIG. 1 depicts a perspective view of an electronic guitar equipped with features of the present inventive disclosure. FIGS. 2A and 2B depicts a close up view of two embodiments of the fretboard of the guitar of FIG. 1 depicting the illuminated panels between the frets which illuminate in different colors as needed during practice to illustrate to the user where to place fingers on frets and strings as well as which fingers to use. The illuminated spaces may also display numbers, symbols, characters to identify musical properties such as pitch, scale degrees, etc. FIG. 2A the entire spaces light up. FIG. 2B just the front half of the spaces light up to indicate correct finger placement. FIG. 3 depicts a top view of an electronic guitar equipped with features of the present inventive disclosure including backlit graphic display, control edit panel, and built in speaker, and a memory flash card receptacle/input/output control panel. FIG. 3A depicts a zoom view of the bottom edge of the base of the guitar of FIG. 3, illustrating the input/output connector panel. FIG. 3B depicts a zoom view of a guitar headstock equipped with electrically driven self adjusting tuning machine heads in accordance with certain embodiments of the present inventive disclosure. FIG. 3C depicts a zoom view of a guitar headstock equipped with manually driven self tuning machine heads including in-tune, sharp and flat illuminated indicators in accordance with certain embodiments of the present inventive disclosure. FIG. 4 depicts a top side view (relative to the user during guitar use) of a guitar neck and fret board showing the backlit screens located near each fret in accordance with certain embodiments of the present inventive disclosure. FIG. 5 depicts musical pitches of fret/string positions on the guitar fret board in standard tuning. FIG. 6 depicts musical pitches, MIDI numbers and frequencies (Hz) corresponding to the pitches depicted in FIG. 5. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In preparation for explaining the details of the present inventive disclosure, it is to be understood by the reader that the invention is not limited to the presented details of the construction, materials and embodiments as illustrated in the accompanying drawings, as the invention concepts are clearly capable of other embodiments and of being practiced and realized in various ways by applying the disclosure presented herein. Turning now to FIG. 1, FIG. 2A and FIG. 2B: FIG. 1 depicts a perspective view of an electronic guitar equipped with features of the present inventive disclosure. FIG. 2 depicts a close up view of the fretboard of the guitar of FIG. 1 depicting the string/transparent spaces between the frets which illuminate (illuminated panels) according to the MIDI chords during practice to illustrate to the user where to place finger on frets and strings. FIG. 2A and FIG. 2B present two embodiments of the illuminated panels 118 in the spaces between the frets 132. In FIG. 2A the illuminated panels 118 are sized to substantially fill the space between the frets 132. In FIG. 2B the illuminated panels 118 are of a of a size occupying roughly half the space between the frets 132. The training apparatus for learning to play the guitar 100 has a guitar body 102, elongated neck 104 secured to the body, an headstock 108 secured to an end of the neck 104. The headstock includes six adjustable machine heads 124 which tension and adjust the instrument strings 116. The guitar body includes one or more electronic pickups 112 under the strings, a bridge 130 secured to the body and tensioning the end of the strings opposite the machine heads 124. Also shown in FIG. 1 is the volume control 126, tone control 128. FIG. 2A and FIG. 2B illustrate the illuminated finger position indicators (transparent illuminated panels between frets 118) located proximate to the frets 132. The illuminated panels 118 are the transparent spaces between the frets secured to the fret board 106. If the fret board is transparent, the illuminated panels 118 may be located within the fret board FIG. 3 depicts a top view of an electronic guitar equipped with features of the present inventive disclosure including backlit graphic display 120, control edit panel 122, pickups 112, speaker 134, volume 126, pickup selectors 170 and tone control 128. The backlit graphic display 120 is hingeably secured to the guitar body 102 such that the graphic display can be opened away from the body and tilted to a position at which the user playing the guitar can easily view the graphic display. If the guitar is transparent, then the graphic display is installed within the guitar (internally) and at an angle that is easily viewed by the player. A memory card receiver/receptacle 136 is built into the guitar body 102 to provide for the use of a flash memory card as one means of transferring music files such as WAV, MP3, encoded MIDI files and other files between the guitar training apparatus 100 and other external devices such as computers. FIG. 3A depicts a zoom view of the bottom edge of the body 102 of the guitar 100 of FIG. 3, illustrating the input/output connector panel 138. The input/out panel 138 has connectors for RCA analog in and out 140, optical in and out 142, Sony/Philips digital interface (S/PDIF) in and out 150, FireWire 144, USB connector 146, at least one MIDI in/out connector 147, and headphone jack 148. FIG. 3B depicts a top view of an electronic guitar, similar to the guitar in FIG. 3 but with electrically driven self adjusting machine heads 152 for adjusting the instrument strings. volume/tone control and pick up selectors panel 162 secured to the body 102 of the guitar. Hard drive 164, interfaced to electronic computer based logic system 166, both secured within the body 102 of the guitar. Transparent fiber optic illuminating spaces between the frets 118 secured to the fret board 106. A rechargeable battery pack 168 secured within the guitar body 102, and a wire harness 172 interconnecting the transparent illuminating spaces between the frets 118 to the electronic computer based logic system 166, and continuing to the head stock 108. In this figure the fret board 106 is made of a transparent material, and the transparent illuminating spaces between the frets are mounted internally in the fret board and illuminating through the transparent material of the fret board. The self adjusting heads 152 rely upon frequency measurement from the electronic pickups (see 112 of FIG. 3) of the six open instrument strings and automatically adjust the tension of the strings for the desired pitch to 20 maintain the guitar in tune. FIG. 3C depicts a zoom view of a guitar headstock 108 equipped with manually driven self tuning machine heads 110 including in-tune 154, sharp 158 and flat 156 illuminated indicators located proximate to each machine head 110 in accordance with certain embodiments of the present inventive disclosure. The heads 110 are adjusted by conventional tuning pegs 124, with each head having the in-tune 154, sharp 158 and flat 156 illuminated indicators (in some embodiments LEDs) positioned about each head. The indicators provide a visual feedback of the detected frequency of each fingered string permitting the user to manually tune the strings with the tuning pegs 110 until the in-tune indicators 154 confirm the strings are in tune. FIG. 4 depicts a top side view of a guitar neck, fret board, and body showing the backlit screens 160 secured to the side of the fret board 106 located in the spaces before each fret 132 in accordance with certain embodiments of the present inventive disclosure. Note that in FIG. 4 a number of backlit screens 160 are shown, but it is to be understood that each fret has a backlit screen associated with it. Hard drive 164, interfaced to electronic computer based logic system 166, both secured within the body 102 of the guitar. A rechargeable battery pack 168 is secured within the guitar body 102. The backlit LCD graphic screen 120 as described previously is interfaced with the electronic computer based logic system 166. FIG. 5 depicts musical pitches of corresponding fret/string positions on the guitar fret board. FIG. 6 depicts musical pitches, MIDI numbers and frequencies (Hz) corresponding to the pitches depicted in FIG. 5, showing the relationship between MIDI numbers in encoded MIDI files and string finger positions to be illuminated on the fretboard. The discussed construction, illustrations and sequence of operation is for one embodiment of the invention, but is in no way limiting to other embodiments. The operating modes may be changed and enhanced without deviating from the intention of this inventive disclosure. In the preceding detailed description, reference has been made to the accompanying drawings that form a part hereof, and in which are shown by way of illustration specific embodiments in which the invention may be practiced. These embodiments and certain variants thereof have been described in sufficient detail to enable those skilled in the art to practice the invention. It is to be understood that other suitable embodiments may be utilized and that logical, material, and mechanical changes may be made without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention. To avoid unnecessary detail, the description omits certain information known to those skilled in the art. The preceding detailed description is, therefore, not intended to be limited to the specific forms set forth herein, but on the contrary, it is intended to cover such alternatives, modifications, and equivalents, as can be reasonably included within the spirit and scope of the appended claims. For more information go to WWW.GAPATENTS.COM or WWW.GOOGLE.COM.

Friday, December 19, 2008

Optical Disc Case Usable in Player with Disc Encased Therein

United States Patent
WWW.USPTO.GOV
7,409,698
Tjensvold , et al.
August 5, 2008
Optical disc case usable in player with disc encased therein
Abstract
A optical disc holder and protector designed to retain a disc and remain thereon when the disc is inserted into a standard disc player/recorder so as to maintain protection of the disc and allow the disc to be utilized in the player/recorder. The disc holder includes a bottom tray configured to receive a standard disc. An upper retaining flange is present contiguously integrated into an outer wall, the upper retaining flange downwardly biases an inserted disc onto a lower retaining flange peripherally disposed adjacent to the outer wall creating a barrier to dust and debris.
Inventors:
Tjensvold; Mark (Gillette, WY), Tjensvold; Mike (Ridgefield, WA)
Appl. No.:
11/251,233
Filed:
October 15, 2005
Current U.S. Class:
720/719 ; 720/736; G9B/23.037; G9B/33.01
Current International Class:
G11B 23/03 (20060101)
Field of Search:
720/719,724,725,736 369/291.1
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Primary Examiner: Klimowicz; William J Attorney, Agent or Firm: Galasso; Raymond M. Galasso & Associates, LP WWW.GAPATENTS.COM
Claims
What is claimed is:1. An optical disc holder comprising: a bottom tray, said bottom tray configured in a substantially planar manner and said bottom tray circular in shape, said bottom tray having a disc resting surface of sufficient size to receive an optical disc thereon; said bottom tray is manufactured of plastic possessing no diffraction properties in the range of 600-800 nm; an opening, said opening being centrally located in said bottom tray, and; an outer wall, said outer wall contiguously mounted to said bottom tray along a peripheral edge, said outer wall being generally perpendicular to said bottom tray; a concave shaped snap groove formed in the outer wall opposite the disk resting surface and protruding slightly inward from a top edge; a snap tongue operable to mate with the snap groove; including an upper retaining flange, said upper retaining flange contiguous with said outer wall, said upper retaining flange being located distally to said bottom tray and generally protruding inward toward said opening, said upper retaining flange for biasing in a downwardly direction an inserted optical disc; a lower retaining flange, said lower retaining flange positioned opposite to said upper retaining flange adjacent to said outer wall and superposed on said bottom tray adjacent to said disc resting surface, said lower retaining flange for engagement with the outer edge of said inserted disc; a lower void; said lower void impervious to dust and debris when the disc is engaged with the retaining flange and the disc resting surface. 2. The disc holder as recited in claim 1, and further including a circular ridge, said circular ridge contiguous to said bottom tray opposite said disc resting surface, said circular ridge disposed about said opening and extending downwardly from said bottom tray. 3. The disc holder as recited in claim 2, wherein said bottom tray is manufactured from a plastic possessing no diffraction properties for wavelengths between 600-800 nm. 4. The disc holder as recited in claim 2, wherein said bottom tray is 0.02 inches thick. 5. The disc holder as recited in claim 4, wherein said central opening is 1 inch in diameter. 6. The disc holder as recited in claim 5, wherein said lower retaining flange is 0.005 inches in width and 0.005 inches in height. 7. A disc holder comprising: a bottom tray, said bottom tray circular in shape and having a disc resting surface of sufficient size to receive a disc; said bottom tray is manufactured of plastic possessing no diffraction properties in the range of 600-800 nm; an upper tray, said upper tray circular in shape, said upper tray being configured to connect with said bottom tray; a central opening, said central opening being located in the midpoint of said bottom tray; an outer wall, said outer wall extending upward disposed on the peripheral edge of said bottom tray, said outer wall perpendicular with said bottom tray and being contiguously formed therewith; and an upper outer wall, said upper outer wall disposed on the upper peripheral edge of said upper tray, said upper outer wall extending downward and perpendicular to said upper tray; and a lower retaining flange, said lower retaining flange circumferentially disposed and adjacent to said outer wall, said lower retaining flange adjacent to said disc resting surface, said lower flange forming a barrier to dust when an inserted disc is biased thereto. 8. The disc holder as recited in claim 7, and further including, a snap groove, said snap groove contiguous with said outer wall opposite to said disc resting surface of said bottom tray, said snap groove for reliably securing said bottom tray and said upper tray. 9. The disc holder as recited in claim 8, and further including a snap tongue, said snap tongue contiguous with upper outer wall, said snap tongue protruding inward for engagement with said snap groove for releasably securing said upper tray to said lower tray. 10. The disc holder as recited in claim 9, and further including an upper retaining flange, said upper retaining flange circumferentially disposed and adjacent to said upper outer wall, said upper retaining flange superposed on the underside of said upper tray. 11. The disc holder as recited in claim 7, and further including a circular ridge, said circular ridge contiguous to said bottom tray opposite said disc resting surface, said circular ridge extending downward from said bottom tray. 12. The disc holder as recited in claim 11, and further including a biasing ridge, said biasing ridge located about said central opening on the interior facing surface of said upper tray, said biasing ridge extending downward from said interior facing surface. 13. The disc holder as recited in claim 12, wherein said bottom tray and said upper tray are 0.02 inches thick. 14. The disc holder as recited in claim 13, wherein said bottom tray is manufactured of plastic possessing no diffraction properties between 600-800 nm.
Description
FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to an optical storage media protective device, more specifically but not by way of limitation, to a CD/DVD protection device that provides protection for the disc during storage and during use in a player/recorder. BACKGROUND With the proliferation of CD and DVD technology, the average consumer now has ten's if not hundreds of discs to manage. The difficulty in using the discs is in the area of disc management. The discs must be stored and then removed from their storage units, usually a standard jewel case made of polystyrene with a hinged cover, and placed in a desired player. Frequently, after normal use, the removing of the disc from its protective case to the player can result in permanent damage. Scratches to the disc, usually caused from dirt or dust accumulated on the disc renders the disc inoperable and must be replaced. It is highly beneficial to a user to keep the optical or information side of the disc free from all debris such as dust. The damaged disc present several problems. First, as discs are used as backup devices in the information technology industry, the loss of crucial data can result in unfortunate circumstances. Another problem is the expense of the loss of data itself or the expense of the act of having to recover the data from another source and record it again on the disc. Another problem for the individual consumer market is the cost of replacing the CD's or DVD's. With the average inventory of discs for the typical consumer being around a hundred discs, the cost of replacing damaged discs each year can be a significant expense. Another problem in the area of disc management is that of shelf space. With the average jewel case being 1-2 cm in width, a slimmer storage case will allow storage of more encased discs per square inch of shelf space. Accordingly, there is a need for a device that can protect the information containing side of CD's or DVD's from contamination of dust and debris without having to be removed from the device in order to use the enclosed disc in a standard CD/CVD player. SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is an object of the present invention to provide a disc storage case for a standard CD/DVD disc, more specifically a disc storage case with a CD/DVD encased therein that allows the user to use an encased CD or DVD in a standard CD/DVD player. It is another object of the present invention to provide a one-sided case for the protection of the optical or information containing side of a CD/DVD disc from contamination such as dust or dirt. A further object of the present invention to provide an alternative embodiment of a CD/DVD disc case that provides protection for both sides of the disc and the disc storage case with the CD/DVD contained therein can be used in a standard CD/DVD player. Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a CD/DVD disc storage case that is compatible multiple with CD and DVD players to allow the disc storage case containing with a CD/DVD disc contained therein to be used in a standard CD/DVD player. It is still another object of the present invention to provide a CD/DVD disc storage case that is manufactured from a polymer with reduced diffraction properties. A further object of the present invention is to provide a CD/DVD disc storage case that is lightweight, durable and relatively thin. To the accomplishment of the above and related objects the present invention may be embodied in the form illustrated in the accompanying drawings. Attention is called to the fact that the drawings are illustrative only. Variations are contemplated as being a part of the present invention, limited only by the scope of the claims. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS A more complete understanding of the present invention may be had by reference to the following Detailed Description and appended claims when taken in conjunction with the accompanying Drawings wherein: FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a single-sided embodiment of the present invention; FIG. 2 is an enlarged partial cross-sectional view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 1; FIG. 3 is an exploded perspective view of a two-sided embodiment of the present invention; and FIG. 4 is an enlarged assembled partial cross-sectional view of the embodiment of FIG. 3. DETAILED DESCRIPTION Referring now to the drawings, wherein various elements depicted are not necessarily drawn to scale, and in particular FIGS. 1 and 2, there is illustrated a disc storage case 100 constructed according to the principles of the present invention. The disc storage case 100 comprises a bottom tray 10 configured in a substantially planar manner having a disc resting surface 20. The bottom tray 10 is circular in shape with the disc resting surface 20 extending inwardly to a central opening 30. The diameter of the bottom tray 10 is approximately 0.04 inches greater than the diameter of the media to be inserted therein. It is contemplated within the scope of the present invention that while good results have been achieved with a bottom tray 10 of a diameter 0.04 inches greater than the diameter of the media to be inserted therein, such as a standard CD, those skilled in the art will recognize that numerous other diameters could be used to achieve the desired function herein. The central opening 30 is circular in shape and of sufficient size to be larger than the standard opening of a disc. Although no specific measurements are required, a central opening 30 of approximately one inch has been shown to achieve good results. This measurement allows the disc retained in the disc storage case 100 to be inserted into a standard CD/DVD player and operate normally. Further, the measurement prevents interference with the disc and its engagement with a standard hub mechanism of a typical jewel storage case and the player. Those skilled in the art will recognize that numerous sizes of the central opening 30 could be used to achieve the function suggested herein. The central opening 30 should be of size so as not to create interference with the information containing area of a conventionally manufactured disc. A standard disc of conventional construction typically has an information containing area and an adjacent non-information containing area along the outer edge 110 of the disc. The bottom tray 10 is designed to be relatively very thin. This facilitates the disc storage case 100 with a disc retained therein to be used normally in a standard CD/DVD player without disruption to the normal mechanisms in the player. Although no specific measurements of the bottom tray 10 are required, good results have been shown to be achieved with a bottom tray 10 of approximately 0.02 inches in thickness. The bottom tray 10 is manufactured from durable plastic or other material. The bottom tray 10 must be manufactured from a group of plastics that exhibit low to no diffraction properties for the wavelength of the laser used to play the disc in standard players, as any diffraction of the laser beam will disrupt the operation of the player. Those skilled in the art will recognize that a standard DVD player utilizes a laser that has a wavelength of approximately 650 nm. The wavelength for a laser in a standard CD player is approximately 780 nm. It is contemplated within the scope of the present invention that the bottom tray 10 would posses low diffraction of wavelengths between 600-800 nm. The bottom tray 10 should allow wavelengths of these approximate measurements to pass through with no diffraction in order to prevent interference with the performance of the CD/DVD player. It is contemplated within the scope of the present invention that the disc storage case 100 could be utilized in numerous devices. More specifically, but not by way of limitation, the disc storage case 100 having a disc encased therein could be used in computers, car stereos, home theater systems and portable game machines designed to utilize optical discs. Proximate to the peripheral edge 50 of the bottom tray 10 and generally perpendicular to the bottom tray 10 is an outer wall 40. The outer wall 40 is contiguous with and extends upwardly from the bottom tray 10. The outer wall 40 is circumferentially disposed along the entire peripheral edge 50 of the bottom tray 10. The portion of the outer wall 40 distal to the bottom tray 10 is shaped to form an upper retaining flange 70. The upper retaining flange 70 protrudes inwardly toward the central opening 30 from the outer wall 40. Mounted opposite the upper retaining flange 70 adjacent to the outer wall 40 and inwardly protruding toward the central opening 30 is a lower retaining flange 80. The lower retaining flange 80 is generally rectangular in shape and is circumferentially disposed along the entire outer wall 40 and is contiguously mounted to the bottom tray 10. The lower retaining flange 80 is used to capture the disc 105 and suspend the disc superposed to the disc resting area 20. Upon placement of a disc 105 on the bottom tray 10, the upper retaining flange 70 downwardly biases the disc 105 against the lower retaining flange 80. This biased position is specifically illustrated in FIG. 2. Once in a biased position, the disc 105 and the disc resting surface 20 form a lower void 90. The lower void 90 is impervious to dust and debris with the outer edge 110 of the disc 105 being downwardly biased by the upper retaining flange 80 onto the lower retaining flange 80. This configuration creates the ability for the disc storage case 100 to effectively encase the information containing side of the disc 105 and be transferred from storage to player in combination preventing damage from occurring to the disc 105. Although no specific measurements are required for the lower retaining flange 80, good results have been shown to be achieved with a lower retaining flange 80 that is 0.005 inches in width and 0.005 inches in height. Now referring in particular to FIG. 2, a downwardly extending circular ridge 60 is formed on the under surface of the bottom tray 10. The circular ridge 60 is disposed about the central opening. The circular ridge 60 allows the disc storage case 100 to readily engage with a standard tray of a jewel case or CD/DVD player. The circular ridge 60 downwardly biases the disc storage case 100 when it is engaged with a standard tray of a jewel case and CD/DVD player. Although no specific measurement is required for the diameter of the circular ridge 60, good results have been shown to be achieved with a diameter that is equal to the central opening 30 as described herein. Referring to FIGS. 3 and 4, there is illustrated an alternative embodiment of the present invention. As illustrated, the disc storage case 200, comprises a bottom tray 210 and an upper tray 220, both configured in a substantially planar manner and circular in shape. The bottom tray 210 and the upper tray 220 both have a diameter generally 0.04 inches greater than the diameter of a standard CD/DVD. Both the bottom tray 210 and the upper tray 220 are approximately 0.02 inches in thickness. Those skilled in the art will recognized that numerous other selections could be made for the thickness of the upper tray 220 and the bottom tray 210 to achieve the functionality suggested herein. As previously referenced herein, the bottom tray 210 should be manufactured from a durable material such as but not limited to plastic that has no diffraction properties for wavelengths between 600-800 nm to prevent interfering with the laser used in standard CD/DVD players. The disc storage case 200 has a first position and a second position with the first position illustrated in FIG. 3 in the drawings submitted herewith. In the first position the upper tray 220 and the bottom tray 210 are disengaged allowing the user to place a disc on the bottom tray. Once a disc is placed on the bottom tray 210 the disc storage case 200 is placed in its second position by releasably securing the upper tray 220 to the bottom tray 210, as shown in FIG. 4. The bottom tray 210 has a disc resting area 230. The disc resting area 230 extends inwardly to a central opening 215. The central opening 215 has an approximate diameter of 1 inch, which prevents the central opening 230 from interfering with the engagement of the disc 205 with a standard hub mechanism on a CD/DVD player or a typical jewel storage case. A standard disc 205 of conventional construction typically has an information containing area and an adjacent non-information containing area along the outer edge 207 of the disc 205. Still referring to FIGS. 3 and 4, circumferentially disposed along the peripheral edge 250 of the bottom tray 210 and contiguously formed therewith is an outer wall 240. The outer wall 240 is generally perpendicular and extends upwardly from the bottom tray 210. Although no specific measurements are required, good results have been shown to be achieved with an outer wall 240 that is approximately 0.02 inches in thickness. The portion of the outer wall 240 positioned distally from the bottom tray 210 is integrally formed therewith a generally concave shaped snap groove 270. The snap groove 270 is formed on the outer wall 240 positioned opposite to the disc resting area 230. The snap groove 270 protrudes slightly inward from the top edge 204 of the outer wall 240 and is configured to mate with the snap tongue 265. Adjacent to the outer wall 240 and superposed on the bottom tray 210 is a lower retaining flange 290. The lower retaining flange 290 is entirely contiguously mounted along the inner circumference of the outer wall 240. As referenced herein, no specific measurements are required but good results have been achieved with a lower retaining flange 290 approximately 0.005 inches in thickness. The lower retaining flange 290 is designed to engage the outer edge 207 of the disc 205, which is generally a non-information containing area on a conventionally manufactured disc 205. Upon engagement with the lower retaining flange 290 the disc 205 and the disc resting area 230 form a lower void 280. The lower void 280 is impervious to dust and debris which facilitates the protection of the information containing or optical side of the disc 205. Referring in particular to FIG. 4, a downwardly extending circular ridge 295 is formed on the under surface of the bottom tray 210. The circular ridge is mounted circumferentially about the central opening. The circular ridge 295 allows the disc storage case 200 to readily engage with a standard tray of a jewel case or a CD/DVD player. The circular ridge 295 downwardly biases the disc storage case 200 when it is engaged with a standard tray of a jewel case or CD/DVD player. Now referring to FIG. 3, the upper tray 220 is manufactured from a durable and lightweight material. More specifically but not by way of limitation plastic. Integrally formed with the upper tray 220 and generally proximate to the upper peripheral edge 255 is the upper outer wall 257. The upper outer wall 257 extends perpendicularly downward from the upper tray 220. An upper retaining flange 285 is located adjacent to the upper outer wall 257 and contiguously mounted with the disc-facing surface 288 of the upper tray 220. The upper retaining flange 285 will downwardly bias a disc 205 against the lower retaining flange 290 when the disc storage case 200 is in the second position. Positioned on the upper outer wall 257 opposite the interior facing surface 258 generally protruding inward is a snap tongue 265. The snap tongue 265 is proximate to the lower edge 282 of the upper outer wall 257. The snap tongue 265 is generally convex in shape and is of specific shape to mate with the snap groove 270. When the user places the upper tray 220 and the bottom tray 210 together, the two trays are releasably secured with the snap groove 270 and the snap tongue 265 biasing the upper outer wall 257 and the outer wall 240 in a generally lateral direction. It is contemplated within the scope of the present invention that many different types of securing mechanisms could be used in place of and or in conjunction with the snap groove 270 and the snap tongue 265. More specifically but not by way of limitation, the disc storage case 200 could be secured together with threads. Extending downward from the underside of the upper tray 220 located proximate to and encircling the central opening 215 is a biasing ridge 293. Although no specific measurements are required, good results have been shown to be achieved with a biasing ridge 293 that extends downwardly for approximately 0.01 inches. The upper ridge 293 downwardly biases the disc 205 against the lower retaining flanges 290 when the upper tray 220 is releasably secured to the bottom tray 210. In the downwardly biased position the outer edge 207 contacts the lower retaining flange 290 creating a lower void 280. The lower void 280 is completely impervious to dust and debris thus protecting the information containing area of the disc 205. Referring in particular to the drawings submitted herewith, more specifically FIG. 1, a description of the operation of the disc storage case 100 is as follows. In use, a user will place a disc on the disc resting surface 20 of the bottom tray 10. The user will exert a slight downward force in the general region of the central opening 30 to engage the outer edge 110 of the disc with the lower retaining flange 80. The upper retaining flange 70 will exert a continuous downward bias on the disc thereby forcing the outer edge 110 of the disc to maintain contact with the lower retaining flange 80. This prevents dust and debris from contacting the information containing area of the disc. Once the disc is engaged in the disc storage case 100 the user can place disc storage case 100 in a desired CD/DVD player and activate the player. Once the user no longer desires to use the player or the disc encased in the disc storage case 100, the user removes the disc storage case 100 with the disc encased therein and can store in a standard jewel case or store without the aid of any additional protection required for the disc in a suitable location. In the preceding detailed description, reference has been made to the accompanying drawings that form a part hereof, and in which are shown by way of illustration specific embodiments in which the invention may be practiced. These embodiments, and certain variants thereof, have been described in sufficient detail to enable those skilled in the art to practice the invention. It is to be understood that other suitable embodiments may be utilized and that logical changes may be made without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention. The description may omit certain information known to those skilled in the art. The preceding detailed description is, therefore, not intended to be limited to the specific forms set forth herein, but on the contrary, it is intended to cover such alternatives, modifications, and equivalents, as can be reasonably included within the spirit and scope of the appended claims. For more information go to WWW.GAPATENTS.COM OR WWW.GOOGLE.COM.