Monday, December 31, 2007

Develope & Market Your Product Idea

Developement & Market Your Idea, On Your Own:
Product Development / Positioning 1.Distinguish Your Product From Competition in a Consumer-Relevant Way. 2.Capitalize on Key Corporate Competencies / Brand Strengths. 3. Develop and Market to People’s Needs and Habits. 4. Market to Long-Term Trends, Not Fads. 5. Don’t Ignore Consumer Research… But Don’t Be Paralyzed By It
Introductory Strategy. 6.Make Sure Your Timing is Right. 7. Be a Marketing Leader, Not a Distant Follower. 8. Offer a Real Value to Consumers. 9. Determine the Product’s Short- and Long-Term Sales Potential. 10. Gain Legitimacy and Momentum for the Brand. 11. Give the Trade As Good a Deal as the Consumer
Communicating the Product Proposition. 12. Clearly Define, Understand, and Talk to Your Target. 13. Develop and Communicate a Distinctive and Appealing Brand Character… And Stick To It. 14. Spend Competitively and Efficiently, Behind a Relevant Proposition.
Use a search engine such as; WWW.GOOGLE.COM or WWW.YAHOO.COM
Follow-Up Strategy 15. Make Sure the Consumer is Satisfied… and Stays That Way
For Patent information contact: WWW.GAPATENTS.COM

Friday, December 28, 2007

United States Patent (WWW.USPTO.GOV)
7,094,969
In
August 22, 2006
Sliding and locking safety cover for electrical outlets
Abstract
An electrical outlet safety cover is provided that includes a sliding cover plate and spring-loaded catches to limit children's access to electrical outlets but to offer quick and easy access to users. The base plate on the safety cover replaces a conventional electrical outlet plate. It includes apertures for electrical outlets and for an attaching screw, and a top panel with two catches and a slot for an opposing catch. The vertical sides of the base plate fit into matching grooves on the vertical sides of a cover plate, which also includes a catch and slots for the catches on the base plate. When the catches are released, the cover plate can thus slide down the base plate, revealing the electrical outlets for use. To prevent access to the outlets, the cover plate can be slid up the base plate until all three catches securely lock.
Inventors:
In; Chanthim (San Jose, CA)
Appl. No.:
11/224,342
Filed:
September 12, 2005
Current U.S. Class:
174/66 ; 174/67; 220/241
Current International Class:
H02G 3/14 (20060101)
Field of Search:
174/66,67 220/241,242
References Cited [Referenced By]
U.S. Patent Documents
4293173
October 1981
Tricca
4950842
August 1990
Menninga
D346949
May 1994
Comerci et al.
6916989
July 2005
Broussard, Jr.
Foreign Patent Documents
1220119
Dec., 1958
FR
1198670
Jul., 1970
GB
Primary Examiner: Patel; Dhiru R. Attorney, Agent or Firm: Galasso; Raymond M. Galasso & Associates, LP (WWW.GAPATENTS.COM)
Claims
What is claimed is:1. An electrical outlet safety cover, comprising an apertured base plate to replace the conventional face plate on an electrical outlet, the base plate comprising a top panel that matches the dimensions of a cover plate such that the top panel and cover plate join when the cover plate is in the closed position to limit access to the electrical outlet; a cover plate that in the closed position substantially covers the base plate; a sliding means, such that the cover plate can be slid along the vertical edges of the base plate; and a locking means, comprising at least one spring-loaded catch with a finger release mounted on the top panel of the base plate; at least one slot on the top panel of the base plate; at least one spring-loaded catch with a finger release mounted on the cover plate, such that at least one spring-loaded catch with a finger release on the cover plate fits lockably into at least one slot on the top panel of the base plate; and at least one slot on the cover plate, such that at least one slot on the cover plate fits lockably over at least one spring-loaded catch with a finger release on the top panel of the base plate. 2. The base plate of claim 1, wherein the base plate comprises at least one aperture that may be placed over an electrical outlet, and at least one aperture through which a screw may be inserted. 3. The aperture that may be placed over an electrical outlet of claim 2, wherein the aperture that may be placed over an electrical outlet comprises two apertures that may be placed over the two sockets on a conventional electrical outlet. 4. The sliding means of claim 1, wherein the sliding means comprises a groove on each vertical edge of the cover plate such that each vertical edge of the base plate can be fit into a groove on the cover plate, and the cover plate can be slid along the vertical edges of the base plate. 5. The sliding means of claim 1, wherein the sliding means comprises a groove on each vertical side of the base plate such that a tongue on each vertical edge of the cover plate can be fit into a groove on the base plate, and the cover plate can be slid along the vertical edges of the base plate. 6. An electrical outlet safety cover, comprising an apertured base plate to replace the conventional face plate on an electrical outlet; the base plate comprising a top panel that matches the dimensions of a cover plate such that the top panel and cover plate join when the cover plate is in the closed position to limit access to the electrical outlet, at least one aperture that may be placed over an electrical outlet, and at least one aperture through which a screw may be inserted; a cover plate that in the closed position substantially covers the base plate; a sliding means, such that the cover plate can be slid along the vertical edges of the base plate; and a locking means for locking the cover plate to the base plate such that the cover plate can be locked into a closed position that substantially covers the electrical outlet, the locking means comprising two spring-loaded catches with finger releases mounted on the top panel of the base plate; one slot on the top panel of the base plate; one spring-loaded catch with a finger release mounted on the cover plate, such that the spring-loaded catch on the cover plate fits lockably into the slot on the top panel of the base plate; and two slots on the cover plate, such that the slots on the cover plate fit lockably over the spring-loaded catches with finger releases on the top panel of the base plate. 7. The aperture that may be placed over an electrical outlet of claim 6, wherein the aperture that may be placed over an electrical outlet comprises two apertures that may be placed over the two sockets on a conventional electrical outlet. 8. The sliding means of claim 6, wherein the sliding means comprises a groove on each vertical edge of the cover plate such that each vertical edge of the base plate can be fit into a groove on the cover plate, and the cover plate can be slid along the vertical edges of the base plate. 9. The sliding means of claim 6, wherein the sliding means comprises a groove on each vertical side of the base plate such that a tongue on each vertical edge of the cover plate can be fit into a groove on the base plate, and the cover plate can be slid along the vertical edges of the base plate. 10. An electrical outlet safety cover, comprising an apertured base plate to replace the conventional face plate on an electrical outlet; the base plate comprising a top panel that matches the dimensions of a cover plate such that the top panel and cover plate join when the cover plate is in the closed position to limit access to the electrical outlet; two apertures that may be placed over the two sockets on a conventional electrical outlet; and an aperture through which a screw may be inserted; a cover plate that in the closed position substantially covers the base plate, the cover plate comprising a groove on each vertical side such that each vertical edge of the base plate can be fit into a groove on the cover plate, and the cover plate can be slid along the vertical edges of the base plate; a locking means for locking the cover plate to the base plate such that the cover plate can be locked into a closed position that fully covers the electrical outlet, the locking means comprising two spring-loaded catches with finger releases mounted on the top panel of the base plate; a slot on the top panel of the base plate; a spring-loaded catch with a finger release mounted on the cover plate, such that the spring-loaded catch on the cover plate fits lockably into the slot on the top panel of the base plate; and two slots on the cover plate, such that the slots on the cover plate fits lockably over the spring-loaded catches on the top panel of the base plate.
Description
FIELD OF THE DISCLOSURE The present invention relates to safety devices for controlling access to electrical outlets and more particularly to an electrical outlet safety cover with a sliding and locking outer plate. BACKGROUND Electrical outlets for supplying electrical power to appliances and machines are common fixtures in homes and buildings. A persistent danger associated with electrical outlets is that children may insert their fingers or other objects into the openings of electrical outlets and be injured or killed or may cause injury to their surroundings. This is a particular risk when nothing is plugged into the openings of the outlets, making them inviting targets for children's curiosity. Because of this danger, many safety devices have been created to limit children's access to the openings in these outlets. For example, plastic safety plugs with prongs that fit snugly into the openings are readily available on the market. Typically parents or other responsible persons insert the safety plugs into electrical outlets, and the plugs fit securely enough that small children have difficulty removing them from the openings with their fingers. Unfortunately one should never underestimate the resourcefulness of small children, who may remove safety plugs with scissors, knives, paperclips, or other tools and so place themselves in danger. Merely by being visible, safety plugs may themselves be taken as a challenge for removal by some children. Other safety devices for electrical outlets are known in the art. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 4,950,842 for Menninga provides a base plate with apertures to replace the conventional face plate of an electrical outlet and a box-like outer cover that locks over the base plate, with openings for passage of an electric cord. A stop bar blocks access to the outlet by children, and the locks on the device are covered by the outer cover and can be released only by an external, magnetic force. Although this device offers substantial protection for children, it may be difficult and awkward to use in some circumstances. For example, a user may need to remove the outer cover quickly to insert a power cord but may not have the required magnetic force at hand. Therefore there is a need for an electrical outlet safety cover with a sliding plate and spring-loaded catches to securely limit children's access to the empty openings in an electrical outlet but to offer quick and easy access to responsible users. SUMMARY OF THE DISCLOSURE The following explanation describes the present invention by way of example and not by way of limitation. It is an aspect of the present invention to provide an electrical outlet safety cover with a sliding plate and spring-loaded catches to securely limit children's access to the empty openings in an electrical outlet but to offer quick and easy access to users. These and other aspects of the present invention will become readily apparent upon further review of the following specification and associated drawings. In accordance with the present invention, an electrical outlet safety cover is provided that comprises a sliding cover plate and spring-loaded catches to limit children's access to electrical outlets but to offer quick and easy access to users. The base plate on the safety cover replaces a conventional electrical outlet plate. It comprises apertures for electrical outlets and for an attaching screw, and a top panel with two catches and a slot for an opposing catch. The vertical sides of the base plate fit into matching grooves on the vertical sides of a cover plate, which also comprises a catch and slots for the catches on the base plate. When the catches are released, the cover plate can thus slide down the base plate, revealing the electrical outlets for use. To prevent access to the outlets, the cover plate can be slid up the base plate until all three catches securely lock. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The following embodiments of the present invention are described by way of example only, with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which: FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a sliding and locking safety cover for electrical outlets with the cover plate fully opened; FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a sliding and locking safety cover mounted to an electrical outlet; and FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a sliding and locking safety cover for electrical outlets with the cover plate fully closed.
For more patent information contact: WWW.GAPATENTS.COM

Wednesday, December 26, 2007

Recently Issued Patent

United States Patent Application 20070266855 Kind Code A1 Fleisher; Aaron L. November 22, 2007 ---------------- AIRPLANE AIR PURIFIER Abstract ---------------- Inventors: Fleisher; Aaron L.; (Las Vegas, NV) Correspondence Name and Address: Galasso & Associates, LP P.O. Box 26503 Austin TX 78755-0503 US Serial No.: 437557 Series Code: 11 Filed: May 19, 2006 United States Patent Application 20070266855 Kind Code A1 Fleisher; Aaron L. November 22, 2007 ---------------- AIRPLANE AIR PURIFIER Abstract An airplane air purifier employs high voltage electrostatic ionic air charging grid and precipitator plates for the removal of particulates and contaminants, together with germicidal capabilities provided by an ultraviolet wavelength band UVC illuminator within the purifier. The purifier is adapted to operate from the aircraft passenger cabin electrical supply or alternately from replaceable or rechargeable batteries. The purifier provided with one or more nozzle adapters to removably and supportively install the air purifier to the typical varieties of aircraft passenger air vent nozzles. The air purifier is small in size and light in weight so as to be easily carried onboard the flight and installed without issue to the air vent nozzle, whereby the air purifier purifies the ducted cabin air in the plane before diffusing into the passenger's breathing air space. ---------------- Inventors: Fleisher; Aaron L.; (Las Vegas, NV) Correspondence Name and Address: Galasso & Associates, LP P.O. Box 26503 Austin TX 78755-0503 US Serial No.: 437557 Series Code: 11 Filed: May 19, 2006 U.S. Current Class: 96/16; 96/55; 96/77 U.S. Class at Publication: 096/016; 096/055; 096/077 Intern'l Class: B03C 3/016 20060101 B03C003/016 ----------------

Saturday, December 22, 2007

Patents/Trademarks Record Highs

Number of US Patents & Trademarks Record High: USPTO 2007 Fiscal Year-End Results Demonstrate Trend of Improved Patent and Trademark Quality Production at all-time record levels Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Commerce's U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) (WWW.USPTO.GOV <http://www.USPTO.GOV> ) today released record breaking year-end numbers that reveal historic improvement in the quality of patent and trademark reviews and subsequently the quality of issued patents and registered trademarks. The quality numbers are part of the agency's FY 2007 Performance and Accountability Report, also released today. "The sustained trend of quality improvements are a tribute to the internal quality initiatives of our managers and employees," said USPTO Director Jon Dudas. "Of course, the quality of patent and trademark examination is a shared responsibility that begins with the application." Patents - Quality and Productivity at Historic Highs: Sustained Focus on Quality Garners Results In FY 2007, USPTO's patent examiners * Examined 362,227 applications - the highest number in history. * Quality compliance was 96.5 percent - equaling last year's results, the best in a quarter century. * Patent examiner decisions were upheld by the USPTO's patent appeals board 69 percent of the time, up from 51 percent in 2005. Trademarks - Exceeding Expectations for a 2nd Record-Breaking Year For the second year in a row, the USPTO has exceeded all of its trademark-related performance goals. * USPTO's trademark examining attorneys examined a record 323,527 applications. * Quality was 97.4 percent. * The quality results exceeded fiscal year 2007 targets. * The average time from filing an initial trademark application to a preliminary decision from an examining attorney (first action) was below 3 months. "American businesses depend heavily on trademark protection for their brand names and service identities," noted Director Dudas." A trademark is often a company's most valuable asset. Consumers also rely on trademarks to help them decide among competing products and services. Thus, I am pleased we are contributing to American commerce by ensuring high quality timely trademark protection." Patent Initiatives - Poised to Make the Process Even Better For more patent & Trademark information contact: WWW.GAPATENTS.COM <http://www.GAPATENTS.COM>

Wednesday, December 19, 2007

Patent Rights Information

What Are Patent Rights:
A patent is not a right to practice or use the invention. [1] Rather, a patent provides the right to exclude others [1] from making, using, selling, offering for sale, or importing the patented invention for the term of the patent, usually 20 years from the filing date. A patent is, in effect, a limited property right that the government offers to inventors in exchange for their agreement to share the details of their inventions with the public. Like any other property right, it may be sold, licensed, mortgaged, assigned or transferred, given away, or simply abandoned. A Search Engine such as: WWW.GOOGLE.COM can be used to find more patent information, or contact: WWW.GAPATENTS.COM
The rights conveyed by a patent vary country-by-country. For example, in the United States, a patent covers research, except "purely philosophical" inquiry. A U.S. patent is infringed by any "making" of the invention, even a making that goes toward development of a new invention — which may itself become subject of a patent. In contrast, Australian law permits others to build on top of a patented invention, by carving out exceptions from infringement for those who conduct research (e.g. for academic purposes) on the invention.[2]
A patent being an exclusionary right does not, however, necessarily give the owner of the patent the right to exploit the patent. [1] For example, many inventions are improvements of prior inventions which may still be covered by someone else's patent. [1] If an inventor takes an existing patented mouse trap design, adds a new feature to make an improved mouse trap, and obtains a patent on the improvement, he or she can only legally build his or her improved mouse trap with permission from the patent holder of the original mouse trap, assuming the original patent is still in force. On the other hand, the owner of the improved mouse trap can exclude the original patent owner from using the improvement.
Some countries have "working provisions" which require that the invention be exploited in the jurisdiction it covers. Consequences of not working an invention vary from one country to another, ranging from revocation of the patent rights to the awarding of a compulsory license awarded by the courts to a party wishing to exploit a patented invention. The patentee has the opportunity to challenge the revocation or license, but is usually required to provide evidence that the reasonable requirements of the public have been met by the working of invention.
For more information contact: WWW.GAPATENTS.COM ; WWW.GOOGLE.COM or WWW.USPTO.GOV

Monday, December 17, 2007

How to Search for Patent Attorneys

To Search for Patent Attorneys and Agents by Last Name:

Go To: WWW.USPTO.GOV

Click on left toolbar to Search for patent attorneys
Enter a last name in the Last Name entry field. (Note that the Exact match radio button is checked by default. Therefore you must spell the last name of the patent attorney or agent correctly.)
Click the Search button.
To Search for Patent Attorneys and Agents by Business/Firm Name:
Enter the name of the business or firm name in the Business/Firm Name entry field. (Note that the Starts with radio button is checked by default.)
Click the Search button.
To Search for Patent Attorneys and Agents in a City:
Enter the name of the city in the City entry field. (Note that the Exact match radio button is checked by default. Therefore you must spell the city correctly.)
Click the Search button.
To Search for Patent Attorneys and Agents in a State or Province:
Select the name of the state or province in the State/Province drop down box.
Click the Search button.
Other Search Tips:
Use the radio buttons to the right of entry fields and drop down boxes to expand or reduce the number of results in your search.
If you can search by Registration Number, you will get the fastest results.
If your search results in multiple pages of data, use the View All link at the bottom right of the search results page to view all the search results at once.
Do not use a period when using a practitioner's initials in the search criteria.

For more patent information contact: WWW.GAPATENTS.COM

Friday, December 14, 2007

ILS/WIPO Information

The International Liaison Staff (ILS) acts in an advisory capacity for the Deputy Commissioner for Patent Examination Policy, and provides international technical support at several levels.
These include:The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO)
There are several focal points of ILS activities at WIPO:
WIPO's Standing Committee on Information Technologies (SCIT). ILS provides technical input and representation to SCIT working groups, principally the Working Group on Standards and Documentation. In the Standards and Documentation Working Group, ILS provides US expertise and representation on the proposal and negotiation of patent document, data and information standards, which are of key importance to USPTO operations. With their backgrounds in international patent standards development, ILS personnel are uniquely qualified for supporting USPTO goals in this technically demanding field.
International Patent Classification (IPC). In the USPTO view, the IPC is at a critical juncture. Its role and ability to respond to patent offices' needs in an increasingly automated environment is tied to the successful implementation of IPC reform, which is scheduled to take effect on January 1, 2006. ILS provides a lead role in development and implementation of the reformed IPC. They coordinate related efforts to ensure that USPTO data delivery (WWW.USPTO.GOV), storage and search systems are developed or modified to take maximum advantage of the reformed IPC.
For more patent information contact: WWW.GAPATENTS.COM

Tuesday, December 11, 2007

Inventors Information

USPTO to Hold Live On-Line Chat for Independent Inventors: Tuesday, December 11 from 2 to 3 PM (EST)
>> Online chat login here-->
Senior officials of the United State Patent and Trademark Office will be available live on-line next Tuesday, December 11, from 2 to 3 PM (EST). They will be answering questions and offering tips for independent inventors. Instructions for taking part in the on-line chat will be posted on the home page of the USPTO web site at 10 AM (EST) next Tuesday. Inventors can begin logging on for the chat at 1:30 PM.
The independent inventor on-line chat is part of the USPTO's continuing efforts to promote and protect America's independent inventors. This effort includes educating inventor-entrepreneurs about the risks of working with invention development companies.
We have transcripts http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/com/iip/onlineiip.htm and frequently-asked questions http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/com/iip/transcripts.htm from previous online available on the Inventors Resource pages. Check them out, your questions may have already been answered for you.
For more information contact: WWW.GAPATENTS.COM
If you missed this live chat, check the website: WWW.USPTO.GOV for the dates of the next live chat.

Thursday, December 6, 2007

Copyright Information

What Is Copyright

Copyright is a form of protection provided by the laws of the United States (title 17, U. S. Code) to the authors of “original works of authorship,” including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. Section 106 of the 1976 Copyright Act generally gives the owner of copyright the exclusive right to do and to authorize others to do the following:
To reproduce the work in copies or phonorecords;
To prepare derivative works based upon the work;
To distribute copies or phonorecords of the work to the public by sale or other transfer of ownership, or by rental, lease, or lending;
To perform the work publicly, in the case of literary, musical, dramatic, and choreographic works, pantomimes, and motion pictures and other audiovisual works;
To display the work publicly, in the case of literary, musical, dramatic, and choreographic works, pantomimes, and pictorial, graphic, or sculptural works, including the individual images of a motion picture or other audiovisual work; and
In the case of sound recordings*, to perform the work publicly by means of a digital audio transmission.
In addition, certain authors of works of visual art have the rights of attribution and integrity as described in section 106A of the 1976 Copyright Act. For further information, request Circular 40, Copyright Registration for Works of the Visual Arts.
It is illegal for anyone to violate any of the rights provided by the copyright law to the owner of copyright. These rights, however, are not unlimited in scope. Sections 107 through 121 of the 1976 Copyright Act establish limitations on these rights. In some cases, these limitations are specified exemptions from copyright liability. One major limitation is the doctrine of “fair use,” which is given a statutory basis in section 107 of the 1976 Copyright Act. In other instances, the limitation takes the form of a “compulsory license” under which certain limited uses of copyrighted works are permitted upon payment of specified royalties and compliance with statutory conditions. For further information about the limitations of any of these rights, consult the copyright law or write to the Copyright Office.
For copyright information contact: WWW.GAPATENTS.COM or WWW.USPTO.GOV

Tuesday, December 4, 2007

USPTO National Trademark Expo Information

USPTO to Hold National Trademark Expo Apply Now to Exhibit:
http://www.uspto.gov/surveys/tmexpo2008.htm
The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) (WWW.USPTO.GOV) will host a showcase for trademarks at its Alexandria, Virginia headquarters April 10-12, 2008. The three day event is designed to engage the public’s interest and educate consumers about the vital role trademarks play in the global economy. Any company with a registered trademark may apply to exhibit. The deadline for applications is December 15, 2007.
Space is limited so apply now.
Potential exhibitors will be evaluated on the following criteria:
Brand recognition - How well-known is the mark.
Educational value of the proposed exhibit - How would the trademark holders participation help educate the public about trademarks.
Category diversity - Does the applicants participation help ensure the Expo has a wide selection of trademarks.
Those selected to exhibit will be notified by January 15, 2008.
>> Frequently Asked Questions About the 2008 USPTO National Trademark Expo
For more information on Trademarks and Trademark filing contact:
WWW.GAPATENTS.COM

Monday, December 3, 2007

2007- Record Number of Patents/Trademarks

Number of US Patents & Trademarks Record High:

USPTO 2007 Fiscal Year-End Results Demonstrate Trend of Improved Patent and Trademark Quality Production at all-time record levels
Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Commerce's U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) (WWW.USPTO.GOV) today released record breaking year-end numbers that reveal historic improvement in the quality of patent and trademark reviews and subsequently the quality of issued patents and registered trademarks. The quality numbers are part of the agency's FY 2007 Performance and Accountability Report, also released today.
"The sustained trend of quality improvements are a tribute to the internal quality initiatives of our managers and employees," said USPTO Director Jon Dudas. "Of course, the quality of patent and trademark examination is a shared responsibility that begins with the application."
Patents - Quality and Productivity at Historic Highs: Sustained Focus on Quality Garners Results
In FY 2007, USPTO's patent examiners
Examined 362,227 applications - the highest number in history.
Quality compliance was 96.5 percent - equaling last year's results, the best in a quarter century.
Patent examiner decisions were upheld by the USPTO's patent appeals board 69 percent of the time, up from 51 percent in 2005.
Trademarks - Exceeding Expectations for a 2nd Record-Breaking Year
For the second year in a row, the USPTO has exceeded all of its trademark-related performance goals.
USPTO's trademark examining attorneys examined a record 323,527 applications.
Quality was 97.4 percent.
The quality results exceeded fiscal year 2007 targets.
The average time from filing an initial trademark application to a preliminary decision from an examining attorney (first action) was below 3 months.
"American businesses depend heavily on trademark protection for their brand names and service identities," noted Director Dudas." A trademark is often a company's most valuable asset. Consumers also rely on trademarks to help them decide among competing products and services. Thus, I am pleased we are contributing to American commerce by ensuring high quality timely trademark protection."
Patent Initiatives - Poised to Make the Process Even Better
For more patent & Trademark information contact: WWW.GAPATENTS.COM

Friday, November 30, 2007

USPTO Patent Examinators Policy

Office of Patent Examination Policy's Responsibility:

The Deputy Commissioner for Patent Examination Policy (WWW.USPTO.GOV) provides staff assistance in establishing patent examination and documentation policy standards for the Commissioner for Patents and is the authority on patent laws, rules, and examining practice and procedure; provides direction on establishment of new rules, practices and procedures; reviews and revises the Manual of Patent Examining Procedure; is the deciding official for petitions on patent matters delegated by the Under Secretary and Director, for ordering Under Secretary and Director ordered re-examinations, for Patent Quality Review appeals to the Commissioner for Patents, for requests for reconsideration of the Board of Patent Appeals and Interferences decisions; review of actions by the Patent Quality Review; and provides support, representation, advice and direction on technical matters relating to the International Patent Classification (IPC) System, and other international documentation-related standards.
For more patent information contact : WWW.GAPATENTS.COM

Thursday, November 29, 2007

Trademark Information

TRADEMARK INFORMATION:
After the USPTO (WWW.USPTO.GOV) determines that you have met the minimum filing requirements, an application serial number is assigned and the application is forwarded to an examining attorney. This may take a number of months. The examining attorney reviews the application to determine whether it complies with all applicable rules and statutes, and includes all required fees. A complete review includes a search for conflicting marks, and an examination of the written application , the drawing , and any specimen .
If the examining attorney decides that a mark should not be registered, the examining attorney will issue a letter (Office action ) explaining any substantive reasons for refusal , and any technical or procedural deficiencies in the application. If only minor corrections are required, the examining attorney may contact the applicant by telephone or e-mail (if the applicant has authorized communication by e-mail). If the examining attorney sends an Office action, the applicant's response to the Office action must be received in the Office within six months of the mailing date of the Office action, or the application will be declared abandoned.
If the applicant's response does not overcome all objections, the examining attorney will issue a final refusal . To attempt to overcome a final refusal, the applicant may, for an additional fee, appeal to the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board (TTAB) , an administrative tribunal within the USPTO.
If the examining attorney raises no objections to registration, or if the applicant overcomes all objections, the examining attorney will approve the mark for publication in the Official Gazette, a weekly publication of the USPTO.
The USPTO will send a Notice Of Publication to the applicant stating the date of publication. After the mark is published in the Official Gazette, any party who believes it may be damaged by registration of the mark has thirty (30) days from the publication date to file either an opposition to registration or a request to extend the time to oppose. An opposition is similar to a proceeding in a federal court, but is held before the TTAB. If no opposition is filed or if the opposition is unsuccessful, the application enters the next stage of the registration process. A Certificate of Registration will issue for applications based on use, on a foreign registration under Section 44 of the Trademark Act, or an extension of protection of an international registration to the United States under Section 66(a). A Notice of Allowance will issue for intent-to-use applications.
If the mark is published based upon the actual use of the mark in commerce, or on a foreign registration, and no party files an opposition or request to extend the time to oppose, the USPTO will normally register the mark and issue a registration certificate about twelve (12) weeks after the date the mark was published.
If the mark is published based upon the applicant's bona fide intention to use the mark in commerce and no party files either an opposition or request to extend the time to oppose, the USPTO will issue a Notice Of Allowance about twelve (12) weeks after the date the mark was published. The applicant then has six (6) months from the date of the Notice of Allowance to either: (1) Use the mark in commerce and submit a Statement of Use; or (2) Request a six-month Extension of Time to File a Statement of Use.

For more Trademark Information and help in preparing and filing trademark registration applications contact: WWW.GAPENTS.COM

Wednesday, November 21, 2007

PCT PATENT INFORMATION

What is a PCT Patent application?

The Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) is an international agreement for filing patent applications having effect in many countries around the world. Although the PCT system does not provide for the grant of “an international patent”, the system simplifies the process of filing patent applications, delays the expenses associated with applying for patent protection in foreign countries, and allows the inventor more time to assess the commercial viability of his/her invention. Under the PCT, an inventor can file a single international patent application in one language with one patent office (WWW.USPTO.GOV, for more information) in order to simultaneously seek protection for an invention in the PCT member countries. For more information see:
WWW.GAPATENTS.COM
PCT Legal Administration Home PageWIPO PCT Systems Home Page
WWW.GOOGLE.COM
WWW.YAHOO.COM

Monday, November 19, 2007

Two or More Persons conceive an Invention Question

If two or more persons conceive an invention, to whom will a United States patent be granted?

A. If each conceived parts of the invention as defined in the claims of a U.S. patent application – even if only as to one claim, they are joint inventors and any patent issued will be issued to them and owned jointly. If, on the other hand, one of these persons conceived all of the parts of the invention, and the other has only followed instructions in making it or reducing it to practice, the person who conceived the invention is the sole inventor and any patent issued will be issued and owned in his/her name alone.
If a first person conceives all parts of an invention and a second person employs the first person or furnishes the money for building and testing the invention, should an United States patent application be filed by the first and second persons jointly?
A. No. The application must be signed by the true inventor, and filed by the inventor in the United States Patent & Trademark Office, WWW.USPTO.GOV in the inventor’s name. This is the person who conceives of all parts of an invention (e.g. the first person in the above fact pattern), not the employer or the person who furnishes the money.
For More Patent Information contact:
WWW.GAPATENTS.COM

Thursday, November 15, 2007

Invention Promoters/Promotion Firms

Before Making Commitments To Invention Promoters/Promotion Firms:

You should check on the reputation of invention promoters/promotion firms before making any commitments. Remember, not all invention promoters/promotion firms are legitimate or acting with your best interests in mind. It's best to be wary of any firm that over promises the likelihood of commercial success of your proposed invention and asks for combined fees based on both marketing and patenting your proposed invention. If you are thinking about using one of these firms, ask for references from their current clients and check the firm's reputation by:

*Looking for complaints listed on the United States Patent & Trademark Office website at http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/com/iip/complaints.htm.
*Check with the Better Business Bureau
*Check with the Chamber of Commerce
*Check the firm with search engines (Google, Yahoo, etc.)

It is prudent to consult with a registered patent attorney. Check with a patent attorney about invention promoter/promotion firms. You may also wish to check on such firms using the following websites:

WWW.USPTO.GOV

WWW.BBB.COM

WWW.GOOGLE.COM

WWW.YAHOO.COM

For More Information From A Registered Patent Attorney, Contact
Galasso & Associates L.P. At:

WWW.GAPATENTS.COM

Wednesday, November 14, 2007

Is My Proposed Idea/Invention Patentable ?

How Do I Know If My Proposed Idea/Invention Is Patentable ?

First, a determination can be made as to whether your proposed idea/invention can meet minimum requirements set forth under U.S. Patent Law and can qualify under the United States Patent & Trademark Office rules and requirements.

Next, a U.S. Patent Search may be conducted to determine if your proposed idea/invention can meet the minimum novelty requirements under U.S. Patent Law. While a U.S. Patent Search before an actual patent application filing is not required, it often times proves advisable to do so.

A registered patent attorney is often the best resource to interpret the results of a U.S. Patent Search and provide recommendations as to the filing of any patent applications. Interpreting the results of a U.S. Patent Search is a difficult process, particularly for the novice.

It is best to use the services of an experienced patent attorney.

To begin investigating the patent search process, and submit your proposed idea/invention go to: WWW.GAPATENTS.COM

For more information on patents go to: WWW.USPTO.GOV

Tuesday, November 13, 2007

INVENTOR TIPS

Inventor Tips

Learn About The Patent Process:
When you understand the basics of how to get a patent, you will know when invention marketers are making promises they, or the patent system, can't deliver.

Do Your Homework:
Check the marketers for references, ask for credentials, and then check them.

Be Realistic:
Not every invention is patentable. Be wary of any developer willing to promote virtually any invention.

Know Where Your Money is going:
Ask the marketer how your money will be spent. Be on Guard against large up-front fees of $5,000-$20,000.

Protect Your Rights:
Do Not disclose your invention to any developer over the phone before signing a confidentiality agreement. You could forfeit valuable patent rights.

Track Your Invention's Progress:
Deal directly with a patent attorney who will be handling your patent application. There are many good patent attorneys that can help you. The United States Patent & Trademark Office maintains a nationwide register of patent attorneys who meet legal, scientific, and technical requirements.
To start your patent process visit WWW.GAPATENTS.COM

Friday, November 9, 2007

Chainsaw Kickback Protection Device Patent




Listed below is a recently issued patent for a safety device for a chainsaw:
Consumer products/Safety products are good product ideas.

( 1 of 1 )
United States Patent
7,284,333
Lawler
October 23, 2007
Chainsaw kickback protection device
Abstract
A chainsaw kickback protection device includes a chain guard and a mounting bracket assembly. The chain guard includes an elongated guard body and a chain-engaging member. The elongated guard body has a channel extending along at least a portion of its length. The chain-engaging member is disposed within the channel extending at least partially along a length of the channel. The mounting bracket assembly includes a mounting bracket and a connection structure. The connection structure is resiliently and pivotably connected between the mounting bracket and the elongated guard body. The connection structure biases the elongated guard body to a non-displaced orientation with respect to the mounting bracket. The connection structure enables the entire elongated guard body to move from the non-displaced orientation to a displaced orientation with respect to the mounting bracket.
Inventors:
Lawler; Julie (Rio Rico, AZ)
Appl. No.:
11/417,818
Filed:
May 4, 2006
Related U.S. Patent Documents
Application Number
Filing Date
Patent Number
Issue Date
60678739
May., 2005
Current U.S. Class:
30/382 ; 30/371
Current International Class:
B26B 17/02 (20060101)
Field of Search:
30/370,371,381,382,383,286
References Cited [Referenced By]
U.S. Patent Documents
3059673
October 1962
Woleslagle
3182695
May 1965
Rigoni
3384136
May 1968
McDonagh et al.
3808684
May 1974
Ludwig
4193193
March 1980
Holzworth
4257162
March 1981
Pardon
4447953
May 1984
Lombardino et al.
4841641
June 1989
Laidlaw
4991297
February 1991
Cain
Primary Examiner: Payer; Hwei-Siu C. Attorney, Agent or Firm: Galasso; Raymond M. Simmons; David O. Galasso & Associates, LP
Parent Case Text
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS This patent application claims priority to co-pending U.S. Provisional Patent Application having Ser. No. 60/678,739 filed May, 6, 2005 entitled "chainsaw kickback protector", having a common applicant herewith and being incorporated herein in its entirety by reference.
Claims
What is claimed is:1. A chainsaw kickback protection device, comprising: an elongated chain guard having a chain-receiving channel extending at least partially along a length thereof; and a mounting bracket assembly including a mounting bracket and a connection structure, wherein the connection structure comprises: spaced apart springs in an over-under orientation; spaced apart hinges in side-by-side orientation each spaced apart hinge comprising a pivot pin; and a dust boot to cover and protect the spaced apart hinges and the spaced apart springs; wherein the connection structure is connected between the mounting bracket and the elongated chain guard, wherein the connection structure biases the elongated chain guard to a non-displaced orientation with respect to the mounting bracket and wherein the connection structure enables the entire elongated chain guard to move from the non-displaced orientation to a displaced orientation with respect to the mounting bracket. 2. The chainsaw kickback protection device of claim 1 wherein the connection structure limits movement of the elongated chain guard to pivoting about a single pivot axis. 3. The chainsaw kickback protection device of claim 2 wherein the single pivot axis extends substantially at a right angle to a longitudinal centerline of the elongated chain guard and substantially transverse to the chain-receiving channel. 4. The chainsaw kickback protection device of claim 1 wherein: the elongated chain guard has an open bottom face and a closed top face opposite the open bottom face; and the connection structure limits movement of the elongated chain guard to pivoting in an up direction and a down direction with respect to the open bottom face and the closed top face. 5. The chainsaw kickback protection device of claim 1 wherein: the elongated chain guard includes an elongated guard body and a chain-engaging member; the chain-receiving channel is within the elongated guard body; and the chain-engaging member is disposed within the channel extending at least partially along a length of the chain-receiving channel. 6. The chainsaw kickback protection device of claim 5 wherein: the elongated guard body is made of a polymeric material having a first flexural strength. 7. The chainsaw kickback protection device of claim 6 wherein: the elongated guard body has an open bottom face and a closed top face opposite the open bottom face; and the connection structure limits movement of the elongated guard body to pivoting in an up direction and a down direction with respect to the open bottom face and the closed top face. 8. A chainsaw kickback protection device, comprising: a chain guard including an elongated guard body and a chain-engaging member, wherein the elongated guard body has a channel extending along at least a portion of its length and wherein the chain-engaging member is disposed within the channel extending at least partially along a length of the channel; and a mounting bracket assembly including a mounting bracket and a connection structure, wherein the connection structure comprises: spaced apart springs in an over-under orientation; spaced apart hinges in side-by-side orientation each spaced apart hinge comprising a pivot pin; and a dust boot to cover and protect the spaced apart hinges and the spaced apart springs; wherein the connection structure is resiliently and pivotably connected between the mounting bracket and the elongated guard body, wherein the connection structure biases the elongated guard body to a non-displaced orientation with respect to the mounting bracket and wherein the connection structure enables the entire elongated guard body to move from the non-displaced orientation to a displaced orientation with respect to the mounting bracket. 9. The chainsaw kickback protection device of claim 8 wherein the connection structure limits movement of the chain guard to pivoting about a single pivot axis. 10. The chainsaw kickback protection device of claim 9 wherein the single pivot axis extends substantially at a right angle to a longitudinal centerline of the chain guard and substantially transverse to the channel. 11. The chainsaw kickback protection device of claim 8 wherein: the chain guard has an open bottom face and a closed top face opposite the open bottom face; and the connection structure limits movement of the chain guard to pivoting in an up direction and a down direction with respect to the open bottom face and the closed top face. 12. The chainsaw kickback protection device of claim 8 wherein: the elongated guard body is made of a polymeric material having a first flexural strength; the chain-engaging member is made of a polymeric material having a second flexural strength. 13. The chainsaw kickback protection device of claim 12 wherein: the elongated guard body has an open bottom face and a closed top face opposite the open bottom face; and the connection structure limits movement of the elongated guard body to pivoting in an up direction and a down direction with respect to the open bottom face and the closed top face. 14. A chainsaw, comprising: an engine block assembly; a chain bar attached to and extending from the engine block assembly; and a chainsaw kickback protection device attached to the engine block assembly and extending directly over a top portion of the chain bar, wherein the chainsaw kickback protection device includes a chain guard, a mounting bracket and a connection structure having spaced apart springs in an over-under orientation and spaced apart hinges in side-by-side orientation each spaced apart hinge comprising a pivot pin; and a dust boot to cover and protect the spaced apart hinges and the spaced apart springs; wherein the connection structure is connected between the mounting bracket and the chain guard, wherein the mounting bracket is fixedly attached to the engine block assembly, wherein the chain guard has an elongated chain-receiving channel extending at least partially along a length of the chain guard, wherein the connection structure biases the chain guard to a non-displaced orientation with respect to the mounting bracket and wherein the connection structure enables the entire chain guard to move from the non-displaced orientation to a displaced orientation with respect to the mounting bracket. 15. The chainsaw of claim 14 wherein: the connection structure limits movement of the chain guard to pivoting about a single pivot axis; and the single pivot axis extends substantially at a right angle to a longitudinal centerline of the chain guard and substantially transverse to the chain-receiving channel. 16. The chainsaw of claim 14 wherein: the chain guard has an open bottom face and a closed top face opposite the open bottom face; and the connection structure limits movement of the chain guard to pivoting in an up direction and a down direction with respect to the open bottom face and the closed top face. 17. The chainsaw of claim 14 wherein: the chain guard includes an elongated guard body and a chain-engaging member; the chain-receiving channel is within the elongated guard body; and the chain-engaging member is disposed within the channel extending at least partially along a length of the chain-receiving channel. 18. The chainsaw of claim 17 wherein: the elongated guard body is made of a polymeric material having a first flexural strength and; the chain-engaging member is made of a polymeric material having a second flexural strength. 19. The chainsaw of claim 18 wherein: the elongated guard body has an open bottom face and a closed top face opposite the open bottom face; and the connection structure limits movement of the elongated guard body to pivoting in an up direction and a down direction with respect to the open bottom face and the closed top face.
Description
FIELD OF THE DISCLOSURE The disclosures made herein relate generally to chainsaw accessory items and, more particularly, to chainsaw kickback protection devices. BACKGROUND The use of hand-held chainsaws has become quite prevalent. They are used as tools of the trade by professionals such as, for example, loggers, tree trimmers and the like. Homeowners also use chainsaws for both routine and major yard projects. The use of a chainsaw brings with it the potential for severe injury. One of the main causes of injury is so-called chainsaw "kickback", which is characterized as a saw portion of the chainsaw being thrown in upward and backward toward the operator. One examples of a situation that cause chainsaw kickback is a chain of the chainsaw striking a knot in wood being cut. Another example is an upper run of the chain (i.e., the chain above a chain bar of the chainsaw) engaging a branch or log while a lower run of the chain is cutting a piece of wood. Regardless of the specific situation that causes kickback, the chainsaw kicks-back and, if the operator is unprepared, the momentum may carry the chain saw back far enough, allowing the upper run of the chain to strike the operator in the chest or head thereby causing severe injury. To overcome this problem, various chain saw guards have been proposed to minimize this problem. While satisfactory, perhaps, these conventional chainsaw guards generally have been found to have certain drawbacks. For example, some are rather complicated in construction and cumbersome to use. Others do not allow for ready attachment to a variety of different types of chain saws, nor afford easy assembly and disassembly. Still others do not allow for ready viewing of the chain, while at the same time affording protection to the operator from flying debris and the possibility of kickback. Still others do not at least partially conceal the saw chain during kickback. Therefore, it is an object of the present invention to provide a chain saw guard that overcomes drawbacks associated with conventional chainsaw guards in a useful, advantageous and novel manner. SUMMARY OF THE DISCLOSURE In one embodiment of the present invention, a chainsaw kickback protection device includes an elongated chain guard and a mounting bracket assembly. The elongated chain guard has a chain-receiving channel extending at least partially along a length thereof. The mounting bracket assembly includes a mounting bracket and a connection structure. The connection structure is connected between the mounting bracket and the elongated chain guard. The connection structure biases the elongated chain guard to a non-displaced orientation with respect to the mounting bracket. The connection structure enables the entire elongated chain guard to move from the non-displaced orientation to a displaced orientation with respect to the mounting bracket. In another embodiment of the present invention, a chainsaw kickback protection device includes a chain guard and a mounting bracket assembly. The chain guard includes an elongated guard body and a chain-engaging member. The elongated guard body has a channel extending along at least a portion of its length. The chain-engaging member is disposed within the channel and extends at least partially along a length of the channel. The mounting bracket assembly includes a mounting bracket and a connection structure. The connection structure is resiliently and pivotably connected between the mounting bracket and the elongated guard body. The connection structure biases the elongated guard body to a non-displaced orientation with respect to the mounting bracket. The connection structure enables the entire elongated guard body to move from the non-displaced orientation to a displaced orientation with respect to the mounting bracket. In another embodiment of the present invention, a chainsaw includes an engine block assembly, a chain bar attached to and extending from the engine block assembly and a chainsaw kickback protection device attached to the engine block assembly and extending directly over a top portion of the chain bar. The chainsaw kickback protection device includes a chain guard, a mounting bracket and a connection structure. The connection structure is connected between the mounting bracket and the chain guard. The mounting bracket is fixedly attached to the engine block assembly. The chain guard has an elongated chain-receiving channel extending at least partially along a length of the chain guard. The connection structure is connected between the mounting bracket and the chain guard. The connection structure biases the chain guard to a non-displaced orientation with respect to the mounting bracket. The connection structure enables the entire chain guard to move from the non-displaced orientation to a displaced orientation with respect to the mounting bracket. Turning now to specific aspects of the present invention, in at least one embodiment, the connection structure limits movement of the elongated chain guard to pivoting about a single pivot axis. In at least one embodiment of the present invention, the single pivot axis extends substantially at a right angle to a longitudinal centerline of the elongated chain guard and substantially transverse to the chain-receiving channel. In at least one embodiment of the present invention, the elongated chain guard has an open bottom face and a closed top face opposite the open bottom face, and the connection structure limits movement of the elongated chain guard to pivoting in an up direction and a down direction with respect to the open bottom face and the closed top face. In at least one embodiment of the present invention, the elongated chain guard includes an elongated guard body and a chain-engaging member, the chain-receiving channel is within the elongated guard body, and the chain-engaging member is disposed within the channel extending at least partially along a length of the chain-receiving channel. In at least one embodiment of the present invention, the elongated guard body is made of a polymeric material having a first flexural strength and a first durometer, the chain-engaging member is made of a polymeric material having a second flexural strength and a second durometer, and the first flexural strength and the first durometer are greater than the second flexural strength and the second durometer, respectively. These and other objects, embodiments, advantages and/or distinctions of the present invention will become readily apparent upon further review of the following specification, associated drawings and appended claims. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view showing a chainsaw kickback protection device in accordance with the present invention. FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line 2-2 in FIG. 1. FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line 3-3 in FIG. 1. FIG. 4 shows the chainsaw kickback protection device in combination with a conventional chainsaw. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIGURES FIGS. 1-4 show various aspects of a chainsaw kickback protection device in accordance with the present invention. The chainsaw kickback protection device shown in FIGS. 1-4 is referred to herein as the chainsaw kickback protection device 10. The chainsaw kickback protection device 10 overcomes drawbacks associated with conventional chainsaw guards and provides for kickback protection functionality in a useful, advantageous and novel manner. The chainsaw kickback protection device 10 includes a chain guard 12 and a mounting bracket assembly 14. The chain guard 12 includes an elongated guard body 16 and a chain-engaging member 18. The elongated guard body 16 has a channel 20 (FIGS. 2 and 3) extending along at least a portion of its length. The chain-engaging member 18 is disposed within the channel 20 and is engaged with an entire portion of a surface of the elongated guard body 16 that defines the channel 20. It is disclosed herein that, optionally, the chain-engaging member 18 may be engaged with less than the entire portion of the surface of the elongated guard body 16 that defines the channel 20. Furthermore, it is disclosed herein that the chain-engaging member 18 may be omitted or may be removably attached to allow for its replacement. As shown, the elongated guard body 16 has a v-shaped cross-sectional profile in the region that defines the channel 20. Optionally, however, the elongated guard body 16 may have a different cross-sectional profile in the region that defines the channel 20 (e.g., u-shaped). The present invention is not limited to the elongated guard body 16 having a particular cross-sectional shape in the region that defines the channel 20. The mounting bracket assembly 14 includes a mounting bracket 22 and a connection structure 24. The mounting bracket may be configured in a universal manner for being attached to almost any brand/model of chainsaw or may be configured for attachment to a particular brand/model of chainsaw. The connection structure 24 is resiliently and pivotably connected between the mounting bracket 22 and the elongated guard body 16. In a specific embodiment as depicted in FIG. 3, the connection structure 24 includes spaced apart hinges 26 (only one shown in the cross sectional view) and spaced apart springs 27. The spaced apart hinges 26 are in a side-by side orientation connected between the mounting bracket 22 and the elongated guard body 16. The spaced apart springs 27 are in an over-under orientation engaged between the mounting bracket 22 and the elongated guard body 16 (i.e., constrained within respective pockets of the mounting bracket 22 and the elongated guard body 16). A pivot axis A1 extends through pivot pins 28 of each one of the hinges 26. The pivot axis A1 extends substantially at a right angle to a longitudinal centerline L1 of the elongated chain guard 16 and substantially transverse a plane that effectively bisects the channel 20. In this manner, the connection structure limits movement of the elongated chain guard to pivoting about a single pivot axis (i.e., pivot axis A1). The spaced apart springs 27 bias the elongated guard body 16 to a non-displaced orientation N with respect to the mounting bracket 22 and enables the entire elongated guard body 16 to move from the non-displaced orientation N to a displaced orientation D with respect to the mounting bracket 22. The connection structure 24 further includes a resilient dust boot 34 that covers and protects the spaced apart hinges 26 and the spaced apart springs 27 from contaminants and damage. It is disclosed herein that the present invention is not limited to a particular configuration of connection structure. Thus, a connection structure in accordance with the present invention may utilize various types and combinations of elements for enabling directionally constrained displacement. For example, in a broad interpretation, the elongated chain guard 16 has an open bottom face 32 and a closed top face 30 opposite the open bottom face 32. The connection structure 24 limits movement of the elongated chain guard to pivoting in an up direction and a down direction with respect to the open bottom face 32 and the closed top face 30. In one embodiment, the elongated guard body is preferably made of a first polymeric material having a first flexural strength and a first durometer and the chain-engaging member is preferably made of a second polymeric material having a second flexural strength and a second durometer. Furthermore, the first flexural strength and the first durometer are preferably greater than the second flexural strength and the second durometer, respectively. Polymeric materials such as nylon and polypropylene are examples of the first polymeric material and polymeric materials such as thermoplastic elastomers and high-density foams are examples of the second polymeric material. Referring now to FIG. 4, the chainsaw kickback protection device 10 is shown in combination with a chainsaw 50. The chainsaw 50 includes an engine block assembly 52 and a chain bar 54. The chain bar 54 is attached to and extends from the engine block assembly 52. A sawing chain 56 is rotatably engaged with chain bar 54. As is consistent with operation of a chainsaw, a drive portion of an engine such as a clutch arrangement (not shown) causes the chain to rotate, thereby facilitating cutting action. The chainsaw kickback protection device 10 is attached to the engine block assembly 52 via the mounting bracket 22. The chainsaw kickback protection device 10 extends directly over a top portion 58 of the chain bar 54. Furthermore, the chainsaw kickback protection device 10 preferably, but not necessarily, extends along an entire length of the chain bar 54. In operation, the chainsaw 50 may exhibit kickback, which is a condition where the saw portion (i.e., chain bar 54 and saw chain 56) is thrown upward and backward toward the operator. During such kickback, the chainsaw kickback protection device 10 is configured for enabling the elongated guard body 16 to move from the non-displaced orientation N to the displaced orientation D such that the saw portion is partially concealed by the channel 20 (i.e., the chain-receiving channel) to limit the potential for a body of a person to come into contact with the saw chain 56. Additionally, the chainsaw kickback protection device 10 may be configured such that the elongated guard body 16 moves sufficiently to allow the chain-engaging member 18 to engage the saw chain 56 thereby causing the saw chain 56 to decelerate and, thus, limit potential injury to the operator. In one embodiment, to enable movement of the elongated guard body 16, the connection structure 14 is configured for enabling the elongated guard body 16 to move from the non-displaced orientation N toward the displaced orientation D when a suitable force is physically applied thereto. For example, when the kickback causes the elongated guard body 16 to hit the body of the operator with sufficient force, the elongated guard body 16 moves from the non-displaced orientation N toward the displaced orientation D. When the elongated guard body 16 hits the body of the operator with sufficient force, the elongated guard body 16 is displaced far enough toward the displaced orientation D so as to cause the chain-engaging member 18 to engage the saw chain 56. In another embodiment, to enable movement of the elongated guard body 16, the connection structure 14 is configured for enabling the elongated guard body 16 to move from the non-displaced orientation N toward the displaced orientation D when a suitable inertial force is generated by motion of the chainsaw 50 caused the kickback. Accordingly, the actual degree of displacement from the non-displaced orientation to the displaced orientation D is proportional to the magnitude of the kickback action. With a sufficiently large kickback action, the inertial force causes the elongated guard body 16 to displace far enough toward the displaced orientation D so as to cause the chain-engaging member 18 to engage the saw chain 56. In the preceding detailed description, reference has been made to the accompanying drawings that form a part hereof, and in which are shown by way of illustration specific embodiments in which the present invention may be practiced. These embodiments, and certain variants thereof, have been described in sufficient detail to enable those skilled in the art to practice embodiments of the present invention. It is to be understood that other suitable embodiments may be utilized and that logical, mechanical, chemical and electrical changes may be made without departing from the spirit or scope of such inventive disclosures. To avoid unnecessary detail, the description omits certain information known to those skilled in the art. The preceding detailed description is, therefore, not intended to be limited to the specific forms set forth herein, but on the contrary, it is intended to cover such alternatives, modifications, and equivalents, as can be reasonably included within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.
* * * * *



Tuesday, November 6, 2007

What is an Untied States Patent ?

An United Sates Patent is intangible property rights granted by the United States Government to an inventor.
Once an United States Patent is issued to an inventor, the Untied States Patent provides the inventor a property right to excludes others from "making, using, offering for sale, or selling the invention throughout the United States or importing the invention into the United States" for a limited time in exchange for public disclosure of the invention.
Based on current United States Patent Law, a United States Patent may be applied for ONLY in the name of the actual inventor(s). For more information see WWW.GAPATENTS.COM

Monday, October 15, 2007

Testing

This is just a sample to see how the new layout works.